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Impact of Duration of Primary Education on School Enrollment, Graduation and Drop-outs: A Cross- Country Analysis

  • Díaz Serrano, Lluís
  • Pérez, Jessica Helen

Using a panel data for non-OECD countries covering the period 1970-2012, this chapter analyzes the impact of the duration of primary education on school enrollment, drop-out and completion rates. The empirical results show that for children in elementary school one ad- ditional grade of primary education have a negative impact on the enrollment rate, while the e ect on drop-outs is positive. Analogously, it is obtained that an additional grade in primary education reduces the enrollment rate in secondary education. These results are in line with the fertility model approach, that is, in developing and underdeveloped countries parents do not have incentive to send children to school given the high perceived economic value of children.

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Paper provided by Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2072/220757.

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Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:urv:wpaper:2072/220757
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