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Do Coup Leaders Matter?


  • Richard Jong-A-Pin
  • Shu Yu


We examine the impact of leadership change after a coup d'etat on economic growth. We consider successful coup attempts as our treatment group and use failed coup attempts as controls to condition on political instability. To take account of selection bias, we control for the determinants of coup success. Our main finding is that leadership changes after a coup d'état have a positive effect on economic growth in the least developed countries, but have a negative effect in other developing countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard Jong-A-Pin & Shu Yu, 2010. "Do Coup Leaders Matter?," KOF Working papers 10-252, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:kof:wpskof:10-252

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Jong-A-Pin, Richard, 2009. "On the measurement of political instability and its impact on economic growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 15-29, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mangaard Jørgensen, Christina & Bjørnskov, Christian, 2015. "Did Africa’s First Choices Matter? Growth Legacies of Leaders at Independence," Working Paper Series 1090, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Gilli, Mario & Li, Yuan, 2015. "Coups, revolutions and efficient policies in autocracies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 109-124.

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    Economic growth; Coup d'état; Political instability;

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