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Health effects of instruction intensity: Evidence from a natural experiment in German high-schools

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  • Quis, Johanna Sophie
  • Reif, Simon

Abstract

A large literature aims to establish a causal link between education and health using changes in compulsory schooling laws. It is however unclear how well more education is operationalized by marginal increases in school years. We shed a new light on this discussion by analyzing the health effects of a reform in Germany where total years of schooling for students in the academic track were reduced from nine to eight while keeping cumulative teaching hours constant by increasing instruction intensity. The sequential introduction of the reform allows us to implement a triple difference-in-differences estimation strategy with data from the German Socio-Economic Panel. We find that increased weekly instruction time has negative health effects for females while they are still in school. However, after graduation, females even seem to benefit from reduced school years. We find no effects on males' health.

Suggested Citation

  • Quis, Johanna Sophie & Reif, Simon, 2017. "Health effects of instruction intensity: Evidence from a natural experiment in German high-schools," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 12/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwqwdp:122017
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    Cited by:

    1. Martin, Carolin & Westerhoff, Frank, 2018. "Regulating speculative housing markets via public housing construction programs: Insights from a heterogeneous agent model," BERG Working Paper Series 135, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    2. March, Christoph & Sahm, Marco, 2017. "Contests as selection mechanisms: The impact of risk aversion," BERG Working Paper Series 127, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    3. Hofmann, Sarah & Mühlenweg, Andrea, 2017. "Learning Intensity Effects in Students' Mental and Physical Health - Evidence from a Large Scale Natural Experiment in Germany," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-622, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    4. Hommes, Cars & Lustenhouwer, Joep & Mavromatis, Kostas, 2018. "Fiscal consolidations and heterogeneous expectations," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 173-205.
    5. Lustenhouwer, Joep & Mavromatis, Kostas, 2017. "Fiscal consolidations and finite planning horizons," BERG Working Paper Series 130, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.
    6. Hommes, Cars H. & Lustenhouwer, Joep, 2017. "Managing unanchored, heterogeneous expectations and liquidity traps," BERG Working Paper Series 131, Bamberg University, Bamberg Economic Research Group.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education and health; instruction intensity; natural experiment; SOEP;

    JEL classification:

    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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