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Promoting labour market integration of refugees with trade preferences: Beyond the EU-Jordan compact

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  • Temprano Arroyo, Heliodoro

Abstract

Trade preferences provide a potential policy tool for supporting refugee employment in countries of first asylum. Thus, in the context of the EU-Jordan Compact agreed in 2016, the EU eased the rules of origin for Jordanian exporters employing a minimum share of Syrian refugees. The use of trade preferences to encourage the labour market integration of refugees is consistent with the new, developmental approach to refugee protection advocated by the recent literature and enshrined in the Comprehensive Refugee Response Framework adopted by the UN in 2016. The paper looks at the so-far disappointing impact of the EU-Jordan agreement on rules of origin, as well as the experience with two relevant U.S. preferential programmes (the Qualified Industrial Zones initiative for Egypt and Jordan and the African Growth and Opportunity Act) that have generated substantial export growth and employment. It then discusses the conditions under which trade preferences can prove an effective instrument for refugee integration and makes some concrete policy recommendations.

Suggested Citation

  • Temprano Arroyo, Heliodoro, 2018. "Promoting labour market integration of refugees with trade preferences: Beyond the EU-Jordan compact," Kiel Working Papers 2108, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2108
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Davies, E. & Nilsson, L., 2013. "A comparative analysis of EU and US trade preferences for the LDCs and AGOA beneficiaries," DG TRADE Chief Economist Notes 2013-1, Directorate General for Trade, European Commission.
    2. Nathaniel P.S. Cook & Jason Cannon Jones, 2015. "The African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) and export diversification," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(7), pages 947-967, October.
    3. Lawrence Edwards & Robert Z. Lawrence, 2014. "AGOA Rules: The Intended and Unintended Consequences of Special Fabric Provisions," NBER Chapters, in: African Successes, Volume III: Modernization and Development, pages 343-393, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Cooke, Edgar F A, 2011. "The impact of trade preferences on exports of developing countries: the case of the AGOA and CBI preferences of the USA," MPRA Paper 31439, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ademmer, Esther & Barslund, Mikkel & Benček, David & Di Salvo, Mattia & Groll, Dominik & Hoxhaj, Rezart & Kadkoy, Omar & Lanati, Mauro & Laurentsyeva, Nadzeya & Lücke, Matthias & Ludolph, Lars & Pizzu, 2018. "2018 MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe. Flexible Solidarity: A comprehensive strategy for asylum and immigration in the EU," MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe, Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM), number 182240, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration; refugees; integration; trade preferences;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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