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Female owners versus female managers: Who is better at introducing innovations?

Author

Listed:
  • Dohse, Dirk
  • Goel, Rajeev K.
  • Nelson, Michael A.

Abstract

This paper uses firm-level survey responses across more than 100 emerging and developing countries to examine whether female managers or female owners of firms were better at bringing innovations to the market. Employing a range of firm-specific and country-specific controls, the econometric results show that female owners of firms, rather than female managers, were more likely to introduce innovations. As expected, innovations resulted from firms engaging in R&D. Larger and older firms reinforced these tendencies; however, sole proprietorships had the opposite effect. The presence of an informal sector and finance availability constraints actually spurred innovation. Finally, the economy-wide effects of greater economic freedom and stronger patent protections were positive, while greater economic prosperity somewhat led to complacency.

Suggested Citation

  • Dohse, Dirk & Goel, Rajeev K. & Nelson, Michael A., 2017. "Female owners versus female managers: Who is better at introducing innovations?," Kiel Working Papers 2091, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:ifwkwp:2091
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    innovation; female; owners; managers; patent protection; R&D; firm size; sole proprietorship;

    JEL classification:

    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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