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Gender patterns in academic entrepreneurship

Author

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  • Maria Abreu

    () (University of Cambridge)

  • Vadim Grinevich

    () (University of Southampton)

Abstract

Our study analyses the determinants of the gender gap in academic entrepreneurship among UK-based academics from across a wide range of academic disciplines. We focus on spinout activity as a measure of academic entrepreneurship, and explore the relevance of the different explanations for the gender gap. Our analysis is based on a unique survey of UK academics conducted in 2008/2009. The survey provides micro-data on over 22,000 academics in the sciences, social sciences, arts and humanities, across all higher education institutions in the UK. Our results show that female academics differ from the male academics in the sample in important ways. Female academics are more likely to be involved in applied research, to hold more junior positions, to work in the health sciences, social sciences, humanities and education, to have less prior experience of running a business, and to feel more ambivalent about research commercialisation. All of these characteristics are correlated with lower rates of spinout activity. Using a non-parametric decomposition analysis, we show that certain combinations of characteristics of male academics have few or no matches to female academics, and these characteristics explain a large proportion of the gender gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Maria Abreu & Vadim Grinevich, 2017. "Gender patterns in academic entrepreneurship," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 42(4), pages 763-794, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:42:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10961-016-9543-y
    DOI: 10.1007/s10961-016-9543-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Domingo Sifontes & Rosa Morales, 2020. "Gender differences and patenting in Latin America: understanding female participation in commercial science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 124(3), pages 2009-2036, September.
    2. Freel, Mark & Persaud, Ajax & Chamberlin, Tyler, 2019. "Faculty ideals and universities' third mission," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 10-21.
    3. Katherina Kuschel & Kerstin Ettl & Cristina Díaz-García & Gry Agnete Alsos, 2020. "Stemming the gender gap in STEM entrepreneurship – insights into women’s entrepreneurship in science, technology, engineering and mathematics," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 1-15, March.
    4. Meng, Donghui & Li, Xianjun & Rong, Ke, 2019. "Industry-to-university knowledge transfer in ecosystem-based academic entrepreneurship: Case study of automotive dynamics & control group in Tsinghua University," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 249-262.
    5. Domingo Sifontes & Rosa Morales, 0. "Gender differences and patenting in Latin America: understanding female participation in commercial science," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 0, pages 1-28.
    6. Igors Skute & Kasia Zalewska-Kurek & Isabella Hatak & Petra Weerd-Nederhof, 2019. "Mapping the field: a bibliometric analysis of the literature on university–industry collaborations," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 916-947, June.
    7. Sara Poggesi & Michela Mari & Luisa Vita & Lene Foss, 2020. "Women entrepreneurship in STEM fields: literature review and future research avenues," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 17-41, March.
    8. Stefan Marc Hossinger & Xiangyu Chen & Arndt Werner, 2020. "Drivers, barriers and success factors of academic spin-offs: a systematic literature review," Management Review Quarterly, Springer, vol. 70(1), pages 97-134, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Academic entrepreneurship; Gender gap; Blinder–Oaxaca; Non-parametric decomposition;

    JEL classification:

    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • L30 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - General
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General

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