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Why Are Some Entrepreneurs More Innovative Than Others?

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  • Koellinger, Ph.D.

Abstract

The study provides theoretical insights and empirical evidence on the emergence of different types and degrees of entrepreneurial innovativeness. The results suggest that entrepreneurial innovativeness depends both on individual factors and on the environment in which the individual lives. In particular, high educational attainment and a high degree of self-confidence are significantly associated with entrepreneurial innovativeness at the individual level. Furthermore, entrepreneurs in highly developed countries are more likely to engage in innovative rather than purely imitative activities. The results also show that product, process, and variety innovations have at least to some extent different antecedents.

Suggested Citation

  • Koellinger, Ph.D., 2007. "Why Are Some Entrepreneurs More Innovative Than Others?," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2007-024-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
  • Handle: RePEc:ems:eureri:9730
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Business opportunities; Entrepreneurship; Innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • M - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics
    • M13 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - New Firms; Startups
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D

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