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Nonpublic Competition and Public School Performance: Evidence from West Virginia

Author

Listed:
  • Richard J. Cebula

    (Jacksonville University, Davis College of Business)

  • Joshua C. Hall

    (West Virginia University, Department of Economics)

  • Maria Y. Tackett

    (West Virginia University, Department of Economics)

Abstract

In this study, we investigate whether nonpublic school enrollment affects the performance of public school districts. If homeschooling and private schools act as competition, public school districts test scores should be positively associated with nonpublic enrollment. Using data on West Virginia county school districts, and controlling for endogeneity with an instrumental variables approach, we find that a one standard deviation increase in relative nonpublic enrollment in a county is associated with statistically significant increases in public school district test scores. Our findings thus confirm that nonpublic enrollment and the competition it provides act to improve, rather than impede, public school performance.

Suggested Citation

  • Richard J. Cebula & Joshua C. Hall & Maria Y. Tackett, 2015. "Nonpublic Competition and Public School Performance: Evidence from West Virginia," Working Papers 15-29, Department of Economics, West Virginia University.
  • Handle: RePEc:wvu:wpaper:15-29
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    competition; markets; education;

    JEL classification:

    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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