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Public Sector Unions and Public Spending

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  • Marlow, Michael L
  • Orzechowski, William

Abstract

This study examines the influence of public sector unions on the expansion of the public sector. Based on public goods theory, the authors' paper models how unions influence the supply of and demand for public sector activities. On the demand side, public sector unions are special interests which advocate public sector expansion to policymakers; on the supply side, they exert pressure to maintain and expand monopoly powers. Empirical evidence supports the hypothesis that a positive relationship exists between public sector unionism and public spending. Copyright 1996 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Marlow, Michael L & Orzechowski, William, 1996. "Public Sector Unions and Public Spending," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 89(1-2), pages 1-16, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:89:y:1996:i:1-2:p:1-16
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    1. Me on CNBC
      by Matt Mitchell in Neighborhood Effects on 2011-02-26 04:37:54

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    Cited by:

    1. Falch, Torberg & Strom, Bjarne, 2007. "Wage bargaining and monopsony," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 202-207, February.
    2. Phuong Nguyen-Hoang, 2015. "Volatile earmarked revenues and state highway expenditures in the United States," Transportation, Springer, vol. 42(2), pages 237-256, March.
    3. Andrea Ceron & Luigi Curini & Fedra Negri, 2019. "Intra-party politics and interest groups: missing links in explaining government effectiveness," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 180(3), pages 407-427, September.
    4. D.P. Doessel & Abbas Valadkhani, 2002. "Public Finance and The Size of Government: A Literature Review and Econometric Results for Fiji," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 108, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
    5. Facchini, Francois, 2014. "The determinants of public spending: a survey in a methodological perspective," MPRA Paper 53006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Michael Marlow, 1997. "Public education supply and student performance," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(5), pages 617-626.
    7. Doessel, Darrel & Valadkhani, Abbas, 2003. "The Demand for Current Public Expenditure in Fiji: Theory and Empirical Results," MPRA Paper 50391, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Michael L. Marlow, 2013. "Public sector unions and government size," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(5), pages 466-470, March.
    9. Richard J. Cebula & Joshua C. Hall & Maria Y. Tackett, 2017. "Non-public competition and public school performance: evidence from West Virginia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1185-1193, March.
    10. Michael L. Marlow, 2013. "Do public sector unions erode business climates?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(15), pages 1413-1417, October.

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