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Does restricting choice in referenda enable governments to spend more?

Author

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  • Randall Holcombe

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  • Lawrence Kenny

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Randall Holcombe & Lawrence Kenny, 2008. "Does restricting choice in referenda enable governments to spend more?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 136(1), pages 87-101, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:136:y:2008:i:1:p:87-101
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-008-9282-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenny, Lawrence W. & Denslow, David Jr., 1980. "Compensating differentials in teachers' salaries," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 198-207, March.
    2. Feld, Lars P. & Matsusaka, John G., 2003. "Budget referendums and government spending: evidence from Swiss cantons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(12), pages 2703-2724, December.
    3. Silva, Fabio & Sonstelie, Jon, 1995. "Did Serrano Cause a Decline in School Spending," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 48(2), pages 199-215, June.
    4. Randall Holcombe & Lawrence Kenny, 2007. "Evidence on voter preferences from unrestricted choice referendums," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 131(1), pages 197-215, April.
    5. Gary M. Pecquet & R. Morris Coats & Steven T. Yen, 1996. "Special Versus General Elections and Composition of the Voters: Evidence From Louisiana School Tax Elections," Public Finance Review, , vol. 24(2), pages 131-147, April.
    6. Silva, Fabio & Sonstelie, Jon, 1995. "Did Serrano Cause a Decline in School Spending," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association, vol. 48(2), pages 199-215, June.
    7. Thomas A. Husted & Lawrence W. Kenny, 2007. "Explanations for States Adopting Limits on Educational Spending," Public Finance Review, , vol. 35(5), pages 586-605, September.
    8. John G. Matsusaka, 2005. "Direct Democracy Works," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 19(2), pages 185-206, Spring.
    9. Munley, Vincent G, 1984. "Has the Median Voter Found a Ballot Box That He Can Control?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(3), pages 323-336, July.
    10. Thomas Romer & Howard Rosenthal, 1979. "Bureaucrats Versus Voters: On the Political Economy of Resource Allocation by Direct Democracy," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 93(4), pages 563-587.
    11. Rexford Santerre, 1989. "Representative versus direct democracy: Are there any expenditure differences?," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 60(2), pages 145-154, February.
    12. Holcombe, Randall G, 1980. "An Empirical Test of the Median Voter Model," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 260-274, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Phuong Nguyen-Hoang, 2012. "Fiscal effects of budget referendums: evidence from New York school districts," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 150(1), pages 77-95, January.
    2. Florian Ade & Ronny Freier, 2011. "When Can We Trust Population Thresholds in Regression Discontinuity Designs?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1136, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Agranov, Marina & Palfrey, Thomas R., 2015. "Equilibrium tax rates and income redistribution: A laboratory study," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 130(C), pages 45-58.
    4. Richard J. Cebula & Joshua C. Hall & Maria Y. Tackett, 2017. "Non-public competition and public school performance: evidence from West Virginia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1185-1193, March.

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