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How Decisive Is the Decisive Voter?

  • Eric J. Brunner

    (Quinnipiac University)

  • Stephen L. Ross

    (University of Connecticut)

This paper examines whether the voter with the median income is decisive in local spending decisions. Previous tests have relied on cross-sectional data while we make use of a pair of California referenda to estimate a first difference specification. The referenda proposed to lower the required vote share for passing local educational bonding initiatives from 67 to 50 percent and 67 to 55 percent, respectively. The jurisdiction median income appears to accurately capture the expected outcomes of majority votes on public service spending, and voters rationally consider such future public service decisions when deciding how to vote on voting rules

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Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2007-28.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2007
Date of revision: Aug 2008
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2007-28
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Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/

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