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The Effect of School District Structure on Education Spending


  • Burnell, Barbara S


This paper develops a theoretical and empirical model of local spending on education that analyzes the effect of institutional structure on education spending. It attempts to determine whether the theory of bureaucratic behavior is consistent with school-district spending decisions by testing the hypothesis that the number of school districts in a county has a negative effect on per pupil expenditures. The results are not consistent with the theory, but indicate that a fragmented school-district structure serves to increase expenditures. Copyright 1991 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

Suggested Citation

  • Burnell, Barbara S, 1991. "The Effect of School District Structure on Education Spending," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 69(3), pages 253-264, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:69:y:1991:i:3:p:253-64

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Catherine Pattillo & Hélène Poirson & Luca Antonio Ricci, 2011. "External Debt and Growth," Review of Economics and Institutions, Università di Perugia, vol. 2(3).
    2. Madhur Gautam, 2003. "Debt Relief for the Poorest : An OED Review of the HIPC Initiative," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15164, March.
    3. Michaelowa, Katharina, 2003. "The Political Economy of the Enhanced HIPC-Initiative," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 114(3-4), pages 461-476, March.
    4. Cohen, Daniel, 1996. "The sustainability of African debt," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1621, The World Bank.
    5. Peter Hjertholm, 2003. "Theoretical and empirical foundations of HIPC debt sustainability targets," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 67-100.
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    Cited by:

    1. Gary Wagner & Tod Porter, 2000. "Location Effects and the Determination of Beginning Teacher Salaries: Evidence from Ohio," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 109-127.
    2. Carlos Renato De Melo Castro & Geraldo Da Silva E Souza & Maria Eduarda Tannuri-Pianto, 2016. "Gastos Em Educação: Mais Recursos Sem Gestão?," Anais do XLIII Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 43rd Brazilian Economics Meeting] 072, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
    3. Landon, Stuart, 1999. "Education costs and institutional structure," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 327-345, June.
    4. Miller, Cynthia, 1996. "Demographics and spending for public education: a test of interest group influence," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 175-185, April.
    5. Richard J. Cebula & Joshua C. Hall & Maria Y. Tackett, 2017. "Non-public competition and public school performance: evidence from West Virginia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(12), pages 1185-1193, March.

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