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Deindustrialisation. Lessons from the StructuralOutcomes of Post-Communist Transition

Author

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  • Tomasz Mickiewicz

    ()

  • Anna Zalewska

    ()

Abstract

Theoretical and empirical studies show that deindustrialisation, broadly observed in developed countries, is an inherent part of the economic development pattern. However, post-communist countries, while being only middle-income economies, have also experienced deindustrialisation. Building on the model developed by Rowthorn and Wells (1987) we explain this phenomenon and show that there is a strong negative relationship between the magnitude of deindustrialisation and the efficiency and consistency of market reforms. We also demonstrate that reforms of the agricultural sector play a significant role in placing a transition country on a development path that guarantees convergence to EU employment structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomasz Mickiewicz & Anna Zalewska, 2002. "Deindustrialisation. Lessons from the StructuralOutcomes of Post-Communist Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 463, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  • Handle: RePEc:wdi:papers:2002-463
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    File URL: http://deepblue.lib.umich.edu/bitstream/2027.42/39847/3/wp463.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ickes, Barry W. & Ofer, Gur, 2006. "The political economy of structural change in Russia," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 409-434, June.
    2. repec:mje:mjejnl:v:13:y:2017:i:2:p:93-106 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:mje:mjejnl:v:11:y:2015:i:1:p:69-84 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Feridun, M. & Isola, W.A., 2005. "Market Driven Reforms and the Structural Characteristics of Employment in Nigeria: An Econometric Analysis, 1986-2003," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 5(1).
    5. Stephan, Johannes, 2002. "Industrial Specialisation and Productivity Catch-Up in CEECs - Patterns and Prospects -," IWH Discussion Papers 166, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    6. repec:mje:mjejnl:v:12:y:2017:i:2:p:93-106 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Peter Huber & Peter Mayerhofer & Gerhard Palme & Martin Feldkircher, 2006. "Centrope – an "Intermediary Region" in Central Europe," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 79(6), pages 467-485, June.
    8. Dr Johannes Stephan, 2004. "Evolving Structural Patterns in the Enlarging European Division of Labour: Sectoral and Branch Specialisation and the Potentials for Closing the Productivity Gap," Development and Comp Systems 0403003, EconWPA.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic transition; employment structures; deindustrialisation; liberalisation; convergence;

    JEL classification:

    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes

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