IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/iwhdps/iwh-166.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Industrial Specialisation and Productivity Catch-Up in CEECs - Patterns and Prospects -

Author

Listed:
  • Stephan, Johannes

Abstract

Research into the structural patterns in Central East European economies’ aggregate value added or production can draw upon a large body of literature. However, this research often stops short of assessing what the patterns described tell us in terms of prospects for catching up of each individual accession candidate to European levels of economic development. This distinct lack is mainly rooted in shortcomings of economic theory, which so far is unable to present a coherent theory of integration between unequal partners and catch up development. This paper therefore uses various ad-hoc assumptions (path dependency, hysteresis, learning-curve, product-cycle, etc.) to predict future catch up scenarios for Estonia, Poland, the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, and Slovenia. The focus is on patterns of specialisation in manufacturing industries. A variety of different taxonomies (OECD, WIFO, own classifications) establishing classes of manufacturing industries correspond to the ad-hoc assumptions used and allow careful prediction of individual paths of catching up in industrial productivity levels. The results of this analysis are particularly important for economic policy in accession candidates and at the EU level in terms of targeting structural and cohesion fund policies to their most efficient use. The analysis uses simple empirical methods working with mainly employment and industry-specific productivity data at NACE 3 digit-levels. The paper establishes an empirical model of typical industrial labour productivity growth determined by patterns of specialisation in manufacturing industries and the extent of backwardness by use of past experience both in EU cohesion and EU accession countries. This model is then applied to predict potentials of productivity growth and prospects of productivity catch-up in several distinct scenarios of structural adjustment in EU accession states. The predictions suggest that productivity catch-up will at the very least take more
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Stephan, Johannes, 2002. "Industrial Specialisation and Productivity Catch-Up in CEECs - Patterns and Prospects -," IWH Discussion Papers 166, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:iwh-166
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/77037/1/166.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yvonne Wolfmayr-Schnitzer, 2000. "Economic Integration, Specialisation and the Location of Industries. A Survey of the Theoretical Literature," Austrian Economic Quarterly, WIFO, vol. 5(2), pages 73-80, May.
    2. Snower, Dennis J., 1994. "The Low-Skill, Bad-Job Trap," CEPR Discussion Papers 999, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Tomasz Mickiewicz & Anna Zalewska, 2002. "Deindustrialisation. Lessons from the StructuralOutcomes of Post-Communist Transition," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 463, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Michael Peneder, "undated". "Intangible Investment and Human Resources. The New WIFO Taxonomy of Manufacturing Industries," WIFO Working Papers 114, WIFO.
    5. Peter Havlik, 2001. "Patterns of Catching-Up in Candidate Countries' Manufacturing Industry," wiiw Research Reports 279, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Yener Kandogan, 2004. "How Much Restructuring did the Transition Countries Experience? Evidence from Quality of their Exports," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-637, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    2. Sandrine Levasseur, 2006. "Convergence and FDI in an enlarged EU: what can we learn from the experience of cohesion countries for the CEECS?," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2006-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    3. Hamar, Judit, 2005. "Üzleti szolgáltatások Magyarországon
      [Business services in Hungary]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(11), pages 881-904.
    4. Dr Johannes Stephan, 2004. "Evolving Structural Patterns in the Enlarging European Division of Labour: Sectoral and Branch Specialisation and the Potentials for Closing the Productivity Gap," Development and Comp Systems 0403003, EconWPA.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:iwhdps:iwh-166. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - German National Library of Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/iwhhhde.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.