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Will the Future Be Better Tomorrow? The Growth Prospects of Transition Economies Revisited

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  • Campos, Nauro F.

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  • Campos, Nauro F., 2001. "Will the Future Be Better Tomorrow? The Growth Prospects of Transition Economies Revisited," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 663-676, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jcecon:v:29:y:2001:i:4:p:663-676
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barbone, Luca & Zalduendo, Juan, 1997. "EU (European Union) accession of central and eastern Europe : bridging the income gap," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1721, The World Bank.
    2. Fischer, Stanley & Sahay, Ratna & Vegh, Carlos, 1998. "How far is Eastern Europe from Brussels?," MPRA Paper 20059, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Gros, Daniel & Suhrcke, Marc, 2000. "Ten years after : what is special about transition countries?," HWWA Discussion Papers 86, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    4. de Melo, Martha & Denizer, Cevdet & Gelb, Alan & Tenev, Stoyan, 1997. "Circumstance and choice : the role of initial conditions and policies in transition economies," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1866, The World Bank.
    5. Ratna Sahay & Jeronimo Zettelmeyer & Eduardo Borensztein & Andrew Berg, 1999. "The Evolution of Output in Transition Economies; Explaining the Differences," IMF Working Papers 99/73, International Monetary Fund.
    6. International Monetary Fund, 2000. "The Great Contractions in Russia, the Baltics and the Other Countries of the Former Soviet Union; A View From the Supply Side," IMF Working Papers 00/32, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Anders Åslund & Peter Boone & Simon Johnson, 1996. "How to Stabilize: Lessons from Post-communist Countries," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(1), pages 217-314.
    8. Jeffrey Sachs & Andrew M. Warner, 1996. "Achieving Rapid Growth in the Transition Economies of Central Europe," CASE Network Studies and Analyses 0073, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fidrmuc, Jan & Tichit, Ariane, 2009. "Mind the break! Accounting for changing patterns of growth during transition," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 138-154, June.
    2. Lawrence King & Patrick Hamm, 2005. "Privatization and State Capacity in Postcommunist Society," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp806, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    3. Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2004. "Does Macroeconomic Policy Affect Private Savings in Europe?: Evidence from a Dynamic Panel Data Model," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 431, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    4. Mechthild Schrooten & Sabine Stephan, 2003. "Private Savings in Eastern European EU-Accession Countries: Evidence from a Dynamic Panel Data Model," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 372, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Fidrmuc, Jan, 2003. "Economic reform, democracy and growth during post-communist transition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 583-604, September.
    6. Rusinova, Desislava, 2007. "Growth in transition: Reexamining the roles of factor inputs and geography," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 233-255, September.
    7. Sandy Dall’erba & Yiannis Kamarianaki & Julie Le Gallo & Maria Plotnikova, 2003. "Regional Productivity Differentials in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic," Urban/Regional 0310004, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Sašo Polanec, 2004. "Convergence at Last? : Evidence from Transition Countries," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 55-80, July.
    9. David Henderson & Robert M McNab & Tamas Rozsas, 2004. "The Hidden Inequality In Socialism," Development and Comp Systems 0411012, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Dall'erba, Sandy & Kamarianakis, Yiannis & Le Gallo, Julie & Plotnikova, Maria, 2005. "Regional Productivity Differentials in Three New Member Countries: What Can We Learn from the 1986 Enlargement to the South?," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 35(1), pages 97-116.
    11. Kosta Josifidis & Radmila Dragutinović Mitrović & Olgica Ivančev, 2012. "Heterogeneity of Growth in the West Balkans and Emerging Europe: A Dynamic Panel Data Model Approach," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 59(2), pages 157-183, May.
    12. da Rocha, Bruno T., 2015. "Let the markets begin: The interplay between free prices and privatisation in early transition," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 350-370.

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