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The Hidden Inequality In Socialism

Author

Listed:
  • David Henderson

    (Naval Postgraduate School)

  • Robert M McNab

    (Naval Postgraduate School)

  • Tamas Rozsas

Abstract

In the same time period over which the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia became freer, measured inequality of income for those countries increased. Researchers linked the increase to the egalitarian values of socialism and to the process of economic and political liberalization. We question that link, because we question whether socialism was egalitarian. The inequalities in socialism were hidden but, nevertheless, were real.

Suggested Citation

  • David Henderson & Robert M McNab & Tamas Rozsas, 2004. "The Hidden Inequality In Socialism," Development and Comp Systems 0411012, EconWPA.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0411012
    Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 32
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    File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0411/0411012.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Saul Estrin, 2002. "Competition and Corporate Governance in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 101-124, Winter.
    2. Gérard Roland, 2002. "The Political Economy of Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 29-50, Winter.
    3. David R. Henderson & Robert M. McNab & Tamas Rozsas, 2008. "Did Inequality Increase in Transition?: An Analysis of the Transition Countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(2), pages 28-49, March.
    4. Mark Gradstein & Branko Milanovic, 2000. "Does Liberté = Egalité? A Survey of the Empirical Evidence on the Links between Political Democracy and Income Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 261, CESifo Group Munich.
    5. Campos, Nauro F., 2001. "Will the Future Be Better Tomorrow? The Growth Prospects of Transition Economies Revisited," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 663-676, December.
    6. Rosser, J. Jr. & Rosser, Marina V. & Ahmed, Ehsan, 2000. "Income Inequality and the Informal Economy in Transition Economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 156-171, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bjørnskov, Christian, 2006. "The Determinants of Trust," Ratio Working Papers 86, The Ratio Institute.
    2. Skopek, Nora & Buchholz, Sandra & Blossfeld, Hans-Peter, 2011. "Wealth inequality in Europe and the delusive egalitarianism of Scandinavian countries," MPRA Paper 35307, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Christian Bjørnskov, 2007. "Determinants of generalized trust: A cross-country comparison," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 130(1), pages 1-21, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transition; Inequality; Socialism; Measurement;

    JEL classification:

    • O - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth
    • P - Economic Systems

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    1. Talk:Income inequality in the United States/Archive 3 in Wikipedia English ne '')
    2. Talk:Income inequality in the United States/Archive 2 in Wikipedia English ne '')

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