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The Hidden Inequality In Socialism

  • David Henderson

    (Naval Postgraduate School)

  • Robert M McNab

    (Naval Postgraduate School)

  • Tamas Rozsas

In the same time period over which the former socialist countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia became freer, measured inequality of income for those countries increased. Researchers linked the increase to the egalitarian values of socialism and to the process of economic and political liberalization. We question that link, because we question whether socialism was egalitarian. The inequalities in socialism were hidden but, nevertheless, were real.

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File URL: http://econwpa.repec.org/eps/dev/papers/0411/0411012.pdf
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Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Development and Comp Systems with number 0411012.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 05 Nov 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpdc:0411012
Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 32
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://econwpa.repec.org

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  1. Campos, Nauro F., 2001. "Will the Future Be Better Tomorrow? The Growth Prospects of Transition Economies Revisited," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 663-676, December.
  2. G�rard Roland, 2002. "The Political Economy of Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 29-50, Winter.
  3. David R. Henderson & Robert M. McNab & Tamas Rozsas, 2008. "Did Inequality Increase in Transition?: An Analysis of the Transition Countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia," Eastern European Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 46(2), pages 28-49, March.
  4. Mark Gradstein & Branko Milanovic, 2000. "Does Liberté = Egalité? A Survey of the Empirical Evidence on the Links between Political Democracy and Income Inequality," CESifo Working Paper Series 261, CESifo Group Munich.
  5. Rosser, J. Jr. & Rosser, Marina V. & Ahmed, Ehsan, 2000. "Income Inequality and the Informal Economy in Transition Economies," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 156-171, March.
  6. Saul Estrin, 2002. "Competition and Corporate Governance in Transition," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(1), pages 101-124, Winter.
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