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Convergence at Last? : Evidence from Transition Countries

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  • SAŠO POLANEC

Abstract

This article reexamines the hypotheses of absolute and conditional convergence for a sample of twenty-five transition countries over the period from 1990 to 2002. After splitting the sample into three four-year periods, the hypotheses are confirmed only for the latest period of transition. For the early transition stage, we find a negative relation between productivity growth, on one hand, and the pace of price liberalization and initial conditions, measured by initial market distortions, on the other hand. In addition, past/ lagged institutional reforms are found to enhance productivity growth in the intermediate and advanced stages of transition. The confirmation of convergence for the latest stage of transition, however, should not yet be considered as a sign of a permanent return to convergence in these countries as it could be the result of differences in the transition cycles.

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  • Sašo Polanec, 2004. "Convergence at Last? : Evidence from Transition Countries," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(4), pages 55-80, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:mes:eaeuec:v:42:y:2004:i:4:p:55-80
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    Cited by:

    1. Iwasaki, Ichiro & Kumo, Kazuhiro, 2016. "Decline and Growth in Transition Economies: A Meta-Analysis," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-9, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    2. Valerija Botric, 2013. "Output Convergence between Western Balkans and EU-15," Research in Economics and Business: Central and Eastern Europe, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology, vol. 5(1).
    3. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2013. "Structural Reforms and Growth in Transition: A Meta-Analysis," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp1057, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    4. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2013. "Structural Reforms and Economic Growth: A Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 2013/08, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    5. Jan Babecky & Tomas Havranek, 2014. "Structural reforms and growth in transition," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 22(1), pages 13-42, January.
    6. Artelaris, Panagiotis & Arvanitidis, Paschalis & Petrakos, George, 2006. "Theoretical and Methodological Study on Dynamic Growth Regions and Factors Explaining their Growth Performance," Papers DYNREG02, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    7. Young-Sun Lee & Hyung-Gon Jeong, 2006. "The determinants of economic growth of transition economies: Economic reform versus initial conditions," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 241-252.
    8. Spruk, Rok, 2011. "Productivity and income convergence in transition: theory and evidence from Central Europe," MPRA Paper 33389, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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