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Australasian money demand stability:Application of structural break tests


  • Don J. Webber

    () (Department of Business Economics, Auckland University of Technology and UWE, Bristol)

  • Saten Kumar

    (Department of Business Economics, Auckland University of Technology and Department of Economics)


Estimates of the demand for money provide important foundations for monetary policy setting but if the estimation technique does not explicitly account for structural changes then such estimates will be biased. This paper presents an investigation into the level and stability of money demand (M1) for Australia and New Zealand over the 1960-2009 period and demonstrates that both countries experienced regime shifts; Australia also experienced an intercept shift. Application of four time series methods provide consistent results with 1984 and 1998 break dates. CUSUM and CUSUMSQ stability tests reveal that M1 demand functions were unstable over the 1984 to 1998 period for both countries although tests for stability are not rejected thereafter.

Suggested Citation

  • Don J. Webber & Saten Kumar, 2011. "Australasian money demand stability:Application of structural break tests," Working Papers 1101, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:1101

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Mohsen Bahmani-oskooee & Charikleia Economidou, 2005. "How stable is the demand for money in Greece?," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(3), pages 461-472.
    2. Adrian Blundell-Wignall & Susan Thorp, 1987. "Money Demand, Own Interest Rates and Deregulation," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp8703, Reserve Bank of Australia.
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    Cited by:

    1. Antonio Paradiso & Saten Kumar & B. Bhaskara Rao, 2013. "The growth effects of education in Australia," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(27), pages 3843-3852, September.

    More about this item


    Money demand; Cointegration; Structural breaks; Australia; New Zealand;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money

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