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Is the US demand for money unstable?

  • B. Bhaskara Rao
  • Saten Kumar

The demand for money (M1) for the US is estimated with annual data from 1960 to 2008 and its stability is analysed with the extended Gregory and Hansen (1996b) test. In addition to estimating the canonical specification, alternative specifications are estimated which include a trend and additional variables to proxy the cost of holding money. Results with our extended specification showed that there has been a structural change in 1998 and the constraint that income elasticity is unity could not be rejected by subsample estimates. Short run dynamic adjustment equations are estimated with the lagged residuals from the Fully Modified Ordinary Least Squares (FMOLS) estimates of cointegrating equation and also with the General to Specific (GETS) approach.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Financial Economics.

Volume (Year): 21 (2011)
Issue (Month): 17 ()
Pages: 1263-1272

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:21:y:2011:i:17:p:1263-1272
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  1. Laurence Ball, 1998. "Another Look at Long-Run Money Demand," NBER Working Papers 6597, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  9. BAI, Jushan & PERRON, Pierre, 1998. "Computation and Analysis of Multiple Structural-Change Models," Cahiers de recherche 9807, Universite de Montreal, Departement de sciences economiques.
  10. Duca, John V. & VanHoose, David D., 2004. "Recent developments in understanding the demand for money," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 247-272.
  11. Hoffman, Dennis L. & Rasche, Robert H. & Tieslau, Margie A., 1995. "The stability of long-run money demand in five industrial countries," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 317-339, April.
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  13. Plamen Yossifov, 2003. "Estimation of a Money Demand Function for M2 in the U.S.A. in a Vector Error Correction Model," Macroeconomics 0302007, EconWPA.
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  17. Kyongwook Choi & Chulho Jung, 2009. "Structural changes and the US money demand function," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(10), pages 1251-1257.
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