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Cointegration, structural breaks and the demand for money in Bangladesh

  • Rao, B. Bhaskara
  • Kumar, Saten

This paper allows for endogenous structural breaks in the cointegration equation and investigates if there is a stable demand for money for Bangladesh. We have used the Gregory and Hansen framework and found that there was an intercept shift and a well- determined and stable demand for money in Bangladesh exists.

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File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/1546/1/MPRA_paper_1546.pdf
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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 1546.

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Date of creation: 16 Jan 2007
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:1546
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  1. Allan w. Gregory & Bruce E. Hansen, 1992. "residual-Based Tests for Cointegration in Models with Regime Shifts," Working Papers 862, Queen's University, Department of Economics.
  2. William Poole, 1969. "Optimal choice of monetary policy instruments in a simple stochastic macro model," Special Studies Papers 2, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Hafez Rehman, 2005. "Stability of the money demand function in Asian developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 773-792.
  4. Eric Zivot & Donald W.K. Andrews, 1990. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil Price Shock, and the Unit Root Hypothesis," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 944, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  5. Akhtar Hossain, 1993. "Financial Reforms, Stability of the Money Demand Function and Monetary Policy in Bangladesh: An Econometric Investigation," Indian Economic Review, Department of Economics, Delhi School of Economics, vol. 28(1), pages 85-100, January.
  6. Paul Turner, 2006. "Response surfaces for an F-test for cointegration," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(8), pages 479-482.
  7. Taylor, Mark P, 1994. "On the Reinterpretation of Money Demand Regressions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(4), pages 851-66, November.
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