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Demand for Money in India: 1953-2003

Author

Listed:
  • B Bhaskara Rao

    (University of the South Pacific)

  • Singh Rup

    (University of the South Pacific)

Abstract

The demand for money, especially in the developing countries, is an important relationship for formulating appropriate monetary policy and targeting monetary variables. In this paper we estimate the demand for narrow money in India and evaluate its robustness. It is found that there is a stable demand for money for almost half a century from 1953 to 2003. There is no evidence for any significant effects of the $1991$ financial reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • B Bhaskara Rao & Singh Rup, 2005. "Demand for Money in India: 1953-2003," Macroeconomics 0510002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpma:0510002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hendry, David F & Mizon, Grayham E, 1978. "Serial Correlation as a Convenient Simplification, not a Nuisance: A Comment on a Study of the Demand for Money by the Bank of England," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 88(351), pages 549-563, September.
    2. R. W. Hafer & Ali Kutan, 2001. "Financial Innovation And The Demand For Money: Evidence From The Philippines," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 17-27.
    3. Kevin D. Hoover & Stephen J. Perez, 1999. "Data mining reconsidered: encompassing and the general-to-specific approach to specification search," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 2(2), pages 167-191.
    4. Taylor, Mark P, 1994. "On the Reinterpretation of Money Demand Regressions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 26(4), pages 851-866, November.
    5. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Hafez Rehman, 2005. "Stability of the money demand function in Asian developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 773-792.
    6. Goodfriend, Marvin, 1985. "Reinterpreting money demand regressions," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 207-241, January.
    7. William Poole, 1970. "Optimal Choice of Monetary Policy Instruments in a Simple Stochastic Macro Model," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(2), pages 197-216.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sahar Bahmani & Ali Kutan, 2010. "How stable is the demand for money in emerging economies?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(26), pages 3307-3318.
    2. Mohammad Naim Azimi, 2016. "Modeling the Clustering Volatility of India¡¯s Wholesale Price Index and the Factors Affecting It," Journal of Management and Sustainability, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 6(1), pages 141-148, March.
    3. Adil, Masudul Hasan & Haider, Salman & Hatekar, Neeraj, 2018. "The empirical verification of money demand in case of India: Post-reform era," MPRA Paper 87148, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Jun 2018.
    4. Akhand Akhtar Hossain, 2015. "The Evolution of Central Banking and Monetary Policy in the Asia-Pacific," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14611, December.
    5. Afsin Sahin, 2013. "Estimating Money Demand Function by a Smooth Transition Regression Model: An Evidence for Turkey," Working Papers 791, Economic Research Forum, revised Nov 2013.
    6. Azimi, Mohammad Naim, 2015. "Modelling the Clustering Volatility of India's Wholesales Price Index and the Factors Affecting it," MPRA Paper 70267, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Rana Ejaz Ali Khan & Qazi Muhammad Adnan Hye, 2013. "Financial liberalization and demand for money: a case of Pakistan," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 47(2), pages 175-198, July-Dece.
    8. Nitin, Arora & Asghar, OsatiEraghi, 2016. "Does India have a stable demand for money function after reforms? A macroeconometric analysis," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 44, pages 25-37.
    9. Takeshi Inoue & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2009. "An Empirical Analysis of the Money Demand Function in India," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 29(2), pages 1224-1245.
    10. Felix S. Nyumuah, 2017. "An Investigation into the Interest Elasticity of Demand for Money in Developing Countries: A Panel Data Approach," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 9(3), pages 69-80, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for money; Developing countries; Income and interest rate elasticities; Cointegration; Financial reforms.;

    JEL classification:

    • C1 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling
    • C8 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs

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