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How stable is the demand for money in emerging economies?

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  • Sahar Bahmani
  • Ali Kutan

Abstract

One of the key elements of implementing the monetary policy is stability of the demand for money. The literature includes a large number of studies that have tested the stability of the money demand in developed as well as less-developed countries but not in emerging economies of Eastern Europe. As market-based data becomes available from these countries, there is an urgency to test old theories for these modern market-oriented economies. In this article we consider the experiences of Armenia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Russia and the Slovak Republic. Using the bounds testing approach to error-correction modelling and cointegration, we show that money demand is stable in these countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Sahar Bahmani & Ali Kutan, 2010. "How stable is the demand for money in emerging economies?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(26), pages 3307-3318.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:42:y:2010:i:26:p:3307-3318
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840802112406
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. A. M. M. Jamal & Yu Hsing, 2011. "The Demand for Money in a Simultaneous-Equation Framework," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 31(2), pages 1929-1934.
    2. Claudiu Tiberiu Albulescu & Dominique Pépin, 2018. "Money demand stability, monetary overhang and inflation forecast in the CEE countries," Working Papers hal-01720319, HAL.
    3. Valentina-Ioana MERA, 2016. "Money Demand Features in CEE Countries," Informatica Economica, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 20(4), pages 88-99.
    4. Rostom,Ahmed Mohamed Tawfick, 2016. "Money demand in the Arab Republic of Egypt : a vector equilibrium correction model," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7679, The World Bank.
    5. Kumar, Saten, 2011. "Financial reforms and money demand: Evidence from 20 developing countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 323-334, September.
    6. Christian Ferrada K. & Mario Tagle E., 2014. "Estimación Reciente de la Demanda de Dinero en Chile," Notas de Investigación Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 17(3), pages 86-109, December.
    7. Sahar Bahmani, 2010. "Openness and the speed of adjustment in the money market," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 34(2), pages 218-227, April.

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