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Financial Innovation And The Demand For Money: Evidence From The Philippines

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  • R. W. Hafer
  • Ali Kutan

Abstract

This paper tests whether financial innovations in the Philippines distorted the long-run relation between real money balances, income and interest rates. Using data for the monetary base, M1 and M3 over the period 1980-1998, we cannot reject the hypothesis that there does not exist a standard money demand relation between M1 and M3, real income and interest rates. However, when we allow for the impact of financial innovations, this finding is reversed for M1. Estimates of ECM models for these measures also show that financial innovations impacted real money balances for M1, but not M3. This evidence supports the Philippine central bank's choice of a monetary aggregate as its policy instrument to achieve its policy objectives. [E41, E58]

Suggested Citation

  • R. W. Hafer & Ali Kutan, 2001. "Financial Innovation And The Demand For Money: Evidence From The Philippines," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 17-27.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:intecj:v:17:y:2001:i:1:p:17-27
    DOI: 10.1080/10168730300080002
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    Cited by:

    1. Rup Singh & Saten Kumar, 2012. "Application of the alternative techniques to estimate demand for money in developing countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 46(2), pages 43-63, July-Dece.
    2. J Paul Dunne and Elizabeth Kasekende, 2016. "Financial Innovation and Money Demand: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 583, Economic Research Southern Africa.
    3. B. Bhaskara Rao & Rup Singh, 2006. "Demand for money in India: 1953-2003," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(11), pages 1319-1326.
    4. B Bhaskara Rao & Rup Singh, 2005. "A Cointegration And Error Correction Approach To Demand For Money In Fiji: 1971-2002," Macroeconomics 0511012, EconWPA.
    5. Singh, Sunny Kumar, 2016. "Currency demand stability in the presence of seasonality and endogenous financial innovation: Evidence from India," MPRA Paper 71552, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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