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Demand for Money in the Transition Economy : The Case of the Czech Republic 1993–2001

  • Komárek Luboš
  • Melecký Martin

In this paper we strive to present a somewhat internationalised view of demand for money as applied to the Czech Republic. We extend the traditional money demand function, consisting purely of domestic variables, to include certain foreign determinants that probably affect the demand for money in a small open transition economy. We do so in the case of both narrow and broad money. For the purposes of generalisation and robust estimates we employ several estimation techniques, namely the Johansen procedure, ARDL, DOLS and ADL. We also consider the aspect of the stability of such estimates. Finally, we analyse the possible effects on prices and output of disequilibria on money market. We have found that a liquidity gap probably has a significant influence on both prices and output.

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Paper provided by University of Warwick, Department of Economics in its series The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) with number 614.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wrk:warwec:614
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  1. Neil R. Ericsson, 1998. "Empirical modeling of money demand," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 295-315.
  2. Uribe, Martin, 1997. "Hysteresis in a simple model of currency substitution," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 185-202, September.
  3. Mulligan, Casey B & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1996. "Adoption of Financial Technologies: Implications for Money Demand and Monetary Policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 1358, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Jose De Gregorio & Peter Wickham & Patricio Arrau & Carmen Reinhart, 1991. "The Demand for Money in Developing Countries: Assessing the Role of Financial innovation," IMF Working Papers 91/45, International Monetary Fund.
  5. Subramanian S. Sriram, 1999. "Survey of Literature on Demand for Money: Theoretical and Empirical Work with Special Reference to Error-Correction Models," IMF Working Papers 99/64, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Vittorio Grilli & Nouriel Roubini, 1995. "Liquidity Models in Open Economies: Theory and Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 95-16, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  7. Handa, Jagdish & Bana, Ismail Mohamed, 1990. "Currency Substitution and Transactions Costs," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 231-43.
  8. Sturzenegger, Federico, 1997. "Understanding the welfare implications of currency substitution," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 21(2-3), pages 391-416.
  9. Carlos A. Végh Gramont & Ratna Sahay, 1995. "Dollarization in Transition Economies: Evidence and Policy Implications," IMF Working Papers 95/96, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Canzoneri, Matthew B. & Diba, Behzad T., 1992. "The inflation discipline of currency substitution," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 827-845, May.
  11. Coenen, Günter & Vega, Juan Luis, 1999. "The demand for M3 in the euro area," Working Paper Series 0006, European Central Bank.
  12. Liliana Rojas-Suárez, 1992. "Currency Substitution and Inflation in Peru," IMF Working Papers 92/33, International Monetary Fund.
  13. Hansen, Bruce E, 1992. "Tests for Parameter Instability in Regressions with I(1) Processes," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 10(3), pages 321-35, July.
  14. Hayo, Bernd, 2000. "The demand for money in Austria," ZEI Working Papers B 06-2000, ZEI - Center for European Integration Studies, University of Bonn.
  15. James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1991. "A simple estimator of cointegrating vectors in higher order integrated systems," Working Paper Series, Macroeconomic Issues 91-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  16. Federico A. Sturzenegger, 1992. "Currency Substitution and the Regressivity of Inflationary Taxation," UCLA Economics Working Papers 656, UCLA Department of Economics.
  17. Brian M. Doyle, 2000. ""Here, dollars, dollars ..."estimating currency demand and worldwide currency substitution," International Finance Discussion Papers 657, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  18. Sarajevs, Vadims, 2000. "Econometric Analysis of Currency Substitution: A Case of Latvia," BOFIT Discussion Papers 4/2000, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  19. Edgar L. Feige & Michael Faulend & Velimir Sonje & Vedran Sosic, 2001. "Currency Substitution, Unoffical Dollarization and Estimates of Foreign Currency Held Abroad: The Case of Croatia," International Finance 0106001, EconWPA.
  20. Milbourne, Ross, 1988. " Disequilibrium Buffer Stock Models: A Survey," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 2(3), pages 187-208.
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