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Liquidity Models in Open Economies: Theory and Empirical Evidence

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  • Vittorio Grilli
  • Nouriel Roubini

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of recent theoretical and empirical reserach on "liquidity models" in open economies; this is a class of optimizing models where money has effects on real asset prices and economic activity without relying on the "ad-hoc" assumption of price/wage stickiness. The non-neutrality of money derives from a temporary segmentation between goods and asset markets. After surveying the theoretical literature on liquidity models, we present empirical evidence based on VAR econometric techniques for the seven major industrial countries. Such evidence is shown to be consistent with the main implications of the liquidity models.

Suggested Citation

  • Vittorio Grilli & Nouriel Roubini, 1995. "Liquidity Models in Open Economies: Theory and Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 95-16, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ste:nystbu:95-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christiano, Lawrence J & Eichenbaum, Martin, 1995. "Liquidity Effects, Monetary Policy, and the Business Cycle," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 27(4), pages 1113-1136, November.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F41 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Open Economy Macroeconomics

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