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Demand for M2 in Developing Countries: An Empirical Panel Investigation

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  • Abbas Valadkhani
  • Mohammad Alauddin

Abstract

A significant body of literature on developed countries support the view that disequilibrium in the money market can affect the future output gap and/or inflation. This paper examines the major determinants of the demand for real money balances in eight developing countries for which consistent annual time series data are available. Pooling cross-country and time series data for the 1979-1999 period and employing the seemingly unrelated regression (SUR) estimation technique, this paper models a standard money demand function. Various country-specific coefficients are allowed to capture inter-country heterogeneities. Consistent with theoretical postulates, this paper finds that the demand for money positively responds to an increase in real income and negatively to a rise in the interest rate spread, the rate of inflation and the US long-term interest rate. This study supports the hypothesis that disequilibrium in the money market can exacerbate inflation and widen the output gap.

Suggested Citation

  • Abbas Valadkhani & Mohammad Alauddin, 2003. "Demand for M2 in Developing Countries: An Empirical Panel Investigation," School of Economics and Finance Discussion Papers and Working Papers Series 149, School of Economics and Finance, Queensland University of Technology.
  • Handle: RePEc:qut:dpaper:149
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Afees Salisu & Idris Ademuyiwa & Basiru Fatai, 2013. "Modelling the Demand for Money in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 635-647.
    2. Rup Singh & Saten Kumar, 2012. "Application of the alternative techniques to estimate demand for money in developing countries," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 46(2), pages 43-63, July-Dece.
    3. repec:rjr:romjef:v::y:2017:i:4:p:84-96 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Helmi Hamdi & Ali Said & Rashid Sbia, 2015. "Empirical Evidence on the Long-Run Money Demand Function in the Gulf Cooperation Council Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 603-612.
    5. Jordan Kjosevski, 2013. "The determinants and stability of money demand in the Republic of Macedonia," Zbornik radova Ekonomskog fakulteta u Rijeci/Proceedings of Rijeka Faculty of Economics, University of Rijeka, Faculty of Economics, vol. 31(1), pages 35-54.
    6. Frauke Dobnik, 2013. "Long-run money demand in OECD countries: what role do common factors play?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 45(1), pages 89-113, August.
    7. Kumar, Saten, 2011. "Financial reforms and money demand: Evidence from 20 developing countries," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 323-334, September.
    8. Saten Kumar & Mamta B. Chowdhury & B. Bhaskara Rao, 2013. "Demand for money in the selected OECD countries: a time series panel data approach and structural breaks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(14), pages 1767-1776, May.
    9. repec:rfh:bbejor:v:6:y:2017:i:1:p:45-57 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Frauke Dobnik, 2011. "OLong-run Money Demand in OECD Countries – Cross-Member Cointegration," Ruhr Economic Papers 0237, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Dobnik, Frauke, 2011. "Long-run Money Demand in OECD Countries – Cross-Member Cointegration," Ruhr Economic Papers 237, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    12. repec:zbw:rwirep:0237 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for Money; Money and Interest Rate Spread; Panel Data;

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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