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Demand for money under low interest rates in Japan

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  • Yutaka Kurihara

    () (Professor, Department of Economics, Aichi University, Japan.)

Abstract

In both theoretical and empirical fields of economics, demand for money has been received much attention in the past. In Japan, deflation has been prevailed more than 20 years, and there is some possibility that the Bank of Japan’s monetary easing policy, which expands money to markets by buying government bonds, has had a significant influence apart from traditional factors. Also, exchange rates for Japanese currency have fluctuated greatly recently because of the introduction of unprecedented monetary policy in the 2010s that may have affected macroeconomic variables and the money demand function in Japan. Using Japanese experience with deflation over last two decades, I provide strong evidence that recent demand for money is affected by real GDP, exchange rates, and economic volatility; however, interest rates and consumer prices have not impacted demand for money. The results also show that introduction of the drastic quantitative easing policy changed the demand function for money.

Suggested Citation

  • Yutaka Kurihara, 2016. "Demand for money under low interest rates in Japan," Journal of Economic and Financial Studies (JEFS), LAR Center Press, vol. 4(4), pages 12-19, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:lrc:lareco:v:4:y:2016:i:4:p:12-19
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand for Money; Exchange Rate; Japan; Monetary Policy; Volatility.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E41 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Demand for Money
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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