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Are geographical indications a worthy quality label? A framework with endogenous quality choice

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  • Desquilbet, Marion
  • Monier-Dilhan, Sylvette

Abstract

We analyze the effects of Geographical Indication (GI) labeling on quality choices and welfare with two vertically differentiated goods, one labelable, the other not. We consider two attributes of these goods: gustatory quality and geographical origin. We investigate two extreme cases of the Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) label: a denomination standard, which guarantees only the origin of the product, without any requirement on production specifications; and a minimum quality requirement, which guarantees both the origin and the quality of the product. We find that the PDO good is not necessarily the high-quality good. When it is, the introduction of the denomination standard causes its quality to decrease. Binding production specifications that maintain the quality level of the labeled good adversely affect the PDO firm.

Suggested Citation

  • Desquilbet, Marion & Monier-Dilhan, Sylvette, 2011. "Are geographical indications a worthy quality label? A framework with endogenous quality choice," TSE Working Papers 11-263, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE), revised Jun 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:tse:wpaper:25317
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sergio H. Lence & Stéphan Marette & Dermot J. Hayes & William Foster, 2007. "Collective Marketing Arrangements for Geographically Differentiated Agricultural Products: Welfare Impacts and Policy Implications," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(4), pages 947-963.
    2. Daniel Pick, 2008. "Geographical Indications and the Competitive Provision of Quality in Agricultural Markets," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 90(3), pages 794-812.
    3. Crampes, Claude & Hollander, Abraham, 1995. "How Many Karats Is Gold: Welfare Effects of Easing a Denomination Standard," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 131-143, March.
    4. Bouamra-Mechemache Zohra & Chaaban Jad, 2010. "Protected Designation of Origin Revisited," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-29, August.
    5. Marette, Stephan & Crespi, John M & Schiavina, Allesandra, 1999. "The Role of Common Labelling in a Context of Asymmetric Information," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 167-178, June.
    6. Tauber, Ramona & Anders, Sven M. & Langinier, Corinne, 2011. "The Economics of Geographical Indications: Welfare Implications," Working Papers 103262, Structure and Performance of Agriculture and Agri-products Industry (SPAA).
    7. Menapace, Luisa & Moschini, GianCarlo, 2010. "Quality Certification by Geographical Indications, Trademarks and Firm Reputation," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61778, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    8. Zago, Angelo M. & Pick, Daniel H., 2004. "Labeling Policies in Food Markets: Private Incentives, Public Intervention, and Welfare Effects," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 29(01), April.
    9. Deselnicu, Oana C. & Costanigro, Marco & Souza-Monteiro, Diogo M. & McFadden, Dawn Thilmany, 2013. "A Meta-Analysis of Geographical Indication Food Valuation Studies: What Drives the Premium for Origin-Based Labels?," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(2), August.
    10. Luisa Menapace & GianCarlo Moschini, 2012. "Quality certification by geographical indications, trademarks and firm reputation," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 39(4), pages 539-566, September.
    11. Stéphan Marette & John Crespi, 2003. "Can Quality Certification Lead to Stable Cartels?," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 23(1), pages 43-64, August.
    12. Claire Chambolle & Eric Giraud-Héraud, 2005. "Certification of Origin as a Non-Tariff Barrier," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 13(3), pages 461-471, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Koen Deconinck & Johan Swinnen, 2014. "The Political Economy of Geographical Indications," LICOS Discussion Papers 35814, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    2. Petit, Michel & Ilbert, Helene, 2015. "Geographic Indicators and Rural Development in North Africa Implications for TTIP Negotiations," 145th Seminar, April 14-15, 2015, Parma, Italy 200231, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Leufkens, Daniel, 2014. "Der Wert Geschützter Herkunftsangaben In Einer Industrieökonomischen Und Hedonischen Preisanalyse," 54th Annual Conference, Goettingen, Germany, September 17-19, 2014 187429, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
    4. Anna Carbone, 2017. "Food supply chains: coordination governance and other shaping forces," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-23, December.
    5. repec:eee:wdevel:v:98:y:2017:i:c:p:45-57 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Zakaria Sorgho & Bruno Larue, 2014. "Geographical indication regulation and intra-trade in the European Union," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 45(S1), pages 1-12, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D21 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Firm Behavior: Theory
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets
    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • Q13 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Markets and Marketing; Cooperatives; Agribusiness

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