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Who benefits from homework assignments?

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Abstract

Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study that analyzes whether assigning homework has an heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases that arise from unobserved school quality, pupil selection by exploiting different methods, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes where nobody gets homework. More precisely pupils belonging to the upper part of the socioeconomic status scale perform better when homework is given, whereas pupils from the lowest part are unaffected. At the same time more disadvantaged children get less help from their parents with their homework. Homework can therefore amplify existing inequalities through complementarities with home inputs.

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  • Marte Rønning, 2008. "Who benefits from homework assignments?," Discussion Papers 566, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:566
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Does homework worsen inequality?
      by Ariel Goldring in Free Market Mojo on 2010-04-23 12:13:12

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    Cited by:

    1. Carlos Cortinhas, 2017. "Does formative feedback help or hinder students? An empirical investigation," Discussion Papers 1701, Exeter University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    pupil performance; school inputs; home-environment;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other

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