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Peer Effects in Academic Research: Senders and Receivers

Author

Listed:
  • Clément Bosquet

    (London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE))

  • Pierre-Philippe Combes

    (Département d'économie)

  • Emeric Henry

    (Département d'économie)

  • Thierry Mayer

    (Département d'économie)

Abstract

Using an instrument based on a national contest in France determining researchers’ location, we find evidence of peer effects in academia, when focusing on precise groups of senders (producing the spillovers) and receivers (benefiting from the spillovers), defined based on field of specialisation, gender and age. These peer effects are shown to exist even outside formal co-authorship relationships. Furthermore, the match between the characteristics of senders and receivers plays a critical role. In particular, men benefit a lot from peer effects provided by men, while all other types of gender combinations produce spillovers twice as small.

Suggested Citation

  • Clément Bosquet & Pierre-Philippe Combes & Emeric Henry & Thierry Mayer, 2019. "Peer Effects in Academic Research: Senders and Receivers," Sciences Po publications 2019-16, Sciences Po.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/65v9ag2jfn865abjgaljmq2qi9
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics of Science; Peer Effects; Research Productivity; Gender Publication Gap;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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