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Peer effects in college academic outcomes – Gender matters!

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  • Ficano, Carlena Cochi

Abstract

An extensive literature exploring a range of peer influences on both academic and non-academic outcomes continues to produce contradictory evidence regarding the existence and magnitude of peer effects. Our results provide no evidence of peer effects in models where peer academic ability is measured in the aggregate. However, models that control for own-gender and other gender peer performance identify strong, positive, and statistically significant male peer influence on male students. In contrast, females are unresponsive to either male or female peer average academic rating. The results highlight the possibility that significant own gendered effects for males may be masked by insignificant effects in the aggregate.

Suggested Citation

  • Ficano, Carlena Cochi, 2012. "Peer effects in college academic outcomes – Gender matters!," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 1102-1115.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:31:y:2012:i:6:p:1102-1115
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2012.07.012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Denny, Kevin & Doyle, Orla & McMullin, Patricia & O'Sullivan, Vincent, 2014. "Money, mentoring and making friends: The impact of a multidimensional access program on student performance," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 167-182.
    2. Oosterbeek, Hessel & van Ewijk, Reyn, 2014. "Gender peer effects in university: Evidence from a randomized experiment," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 51-63.
    3. Hill, Andrew J., 2017. "The positive influence of female college students on their male peers," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 151-160.
    4. Oleg V. Poldin & Tania P. Simoes & Marcelo Knobel & Maria M. Yudkevich, 2015. "Estimation of Peer Effects with Predicted Social Ties: Evidence from Two Universities in Brazil and Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 30/EDU/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peer effects; Educational economics;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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