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Students' beliefs about peer effects

Listed author(s):
  • Foster, Gigi
  • Frijters, Paul

We propose a simple short-cut to the problem of estimating endogenous peer effects from observed behavior: asking students about peers' ability and their own effort. Our survey evidence indicates that students believe in own-peer complementarities in educational production.

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File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165-1765(10)00213-2
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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 108 (2010)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 260-263

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:108:y:2010:i:3:p:260-263
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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  1. Todd R. Stinebrickner & Ralph Stinebrickner, 2007. "The Causal Effect of Studying on Academic Performance," University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP) Working Papers 20072, University of Western Ontario, Centre for Human Capital and Productivity (CHCP).
  2. Jacob M. Markman & Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2003. "Does peer ability affect student achievement?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(5), pages 527-544.
  3. Eisenkopf, Gerald, 2010. "Peer effects, motivation, and learning," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 364-374, June.
  4. Ammermüller, Andreas & Pischke, Jörn-Steffen, 2006. "Peer Effects in European Primary Schools: Evidence from PIRLS," CEPR Discussion Papers 5660, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Weili Ding & Steven F. Lehrer, 2006. "Do Peers Affect Student Achievement in China's Secondary Schools?," NBER Working Papers 12305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Brock, William A. & Durlauf, Steven N., 2007. "Identification of binary choice models with social interactions," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 52-75, September.
  7. Kang, Changhui, 2007. "Classroom peer effects and academic achievement: Quasi-randomization evidence from South Korea," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 458-495, May.
  8. Steve Gibbons & Shqiponja Telhaj, 2006. "Peer Effects and Pupil Attainment: Evidence from Secondary School Transition," CEE Discussion Papers 0063, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  9. Zimmerman, David J., 1999. "Peer Effects in Academic Outcomes: Evidence From a Natural Experiment," Williams Project on the Economics of Higher Education DP-52, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  10. Lefgren, Lars, 2004. "Educational peer effects and the Chicago public schools," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 169-191, September.
  11. Andrew J. Houtenville & Karen Smith Conway, 2008. "Parental Effort, School Resources, and Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(2), pages 437-453.
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