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Schumpeterian business cycles

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  • Filip Rozsypal

    (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

This paper presents an economy where business cycles and long term growth are both endogenously generated by the same type of iid shocks. I embed a multi-sector real business cycle model into an endogenous growth framework where innovating firms replace incumbent production firms. The only source of uncertainty is the imperfectly observed quality of innovation projects. As long as the goods are complements, a successful innovation in one sector increases demand for the output of other sectors. Higher profits motivate higher innovation efforts in the other sectors. The increase in productivity in one sector is thus followed by increases in productivity in the other sectors and the initial innovation generates persistent movement in aggregate productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Filip Rozsypal, 2015. "Schumpeterian business cycles," 2015 Meeting Papers 320, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:320
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Philipp Pfeiffer, 2017. "How much Keynes and how much Schumpeter? An Estimated Macromodel of the US Economy," 2017 Meeting Papers 324, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Marcin Bielecki, 2017. "Business cycles, innovation and growth: welfare analysis," Working Papers 2017-19, Faculty of Economic Sciences, University of Warsaw.
    3. Cozzi, Guido & Pataracchia, Beatrice & Pfeiffer, Philipp & Marco, Ratto, 2017. "How much Keynes and how much Schumpeter? An Estimated Macromodel of the US Economy," Working Papers 2017-01, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Ispra site).

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