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Technology Shocks and Job Flows

  • Lopez-Salido, Jose David
  • Michelacci, Claudio

We decompose the low-frequency movements in labour productivity into an investment-neutral and investment-specific technology component. We show that neutral technology shocks cause an increase in job creation and job destruction and lead to a reduction in aggregate employment. Investment-specific technology shocks reduce job destruction, have mild effects on job creation and are expansionary. We construct a general equilibrium search model with neutral and investment-specific technological progress. We show that the model can replicate these findings if neutral technological progress is mainly embodied into new jobs, while investment-specific technological progress benefits (almost) equally old and new jobs. Thus neutral technological advances prompt waves of Schumpeterian creative destruction, while the adoption of investment-specific technologies operates mainly as in the standard neoclassical growth model.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 4426.

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Date of creation: Jun 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4426
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