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Why Are Some Immigrant Groups More Successful than Others?

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  • Edward P. Lazear

Abstract

Success of immigrants in the US, measured by earnings or education, varies dramatically by country of origin. Surprisingly, immigrants from Algeria have higher educational attainment than those from Israel or Japan. Another fact: The US admits few migrants from Algeria. Immigration slots are rationed and as a consequence, average immigrant attainment is inversely related to the number from a source country and positively related to its population and education level. The formal model’s three variables explain 73% of the variation in educational attainment of immigrant groups in the US. The theory and predictions are bolstered by Swedish and Canadian data.

Suggested Citation

  • Edward P. Lazear, 2017. "Why Are Some Immigrant Groups More Successful than Others?," NBER Working Papers 23548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23548
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Why Are Some Immigrant Groups More Successful than Others?
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2017-08-11 17:43:27

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • M5 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics

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