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Attracting Talent: Location Choices of Foreign-born PhDs in the United States

In: US High-Skilled Immigration in the Global Economy

Author

Listed:
  • Jeffrey Grogger
  • Gordon H. Hanson

Abstract

We analyze location choices of foreign-born science and engineering students receiving PhDs from US universities. Foreign students who stay in the United States are positively selected on observables. They tend to stay in the United States during periods of strong US economic growth and during periods of weak home country economic growth. Foreign students from higher-income countries and from recently democratized countries tend not to remain in the United States. Education and innovation may therefore be part of a virtuous cycle by which education enhances a country's prospects for innovation and innovation makes the country more attractive for scientists and engineers.
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Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Grogger & Gordon H. Hanson, 2012. "Attracting Talent: Location Choices of Foreign-born PhDs in the United States," NBER Chapters,in: US High-Skilled Immigration in the Global Economy, pages 5-38 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:13242
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Parey & Jens Ruhose & Fabian Waldinger & Nicolai Netz, 2017. "The Selection of High-Skilled Emigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 99(5), pages 776-792, December.
    2. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:5:p:886-900 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:nbr:nberch:14108 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:aea:jeclit:v:55:y:2017:i:4:p:1311-45 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Ina Ganguli & Patrick Gaulé, 2019. "Will the U.S. Keep the Best and the Brightest (as Post-docs)? Career and Location Preferences of Foreign STEM PhDs," NBER Chapters,in: The Roles of Immigrants and Foreign Students in U.S. Science, Innovation, and Entrepreneurship National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. repec:anr:reveco:v:9:y:2017:p:201-234 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Sari Pekkala Kerr & William Kerr & Çağlar Özden & Christopher Parsons, 2017. "High-Skilled Migration and Agglomeration," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 9(1), pages 201-234, September.
    8. Blume-Kohout, Margaret E. & Adhikari, Dadhi, 2016. "Training the scientific workforce: Does funding mechanism matter?," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(6), pages 1291-1303.
    9. Marco Di Cintio & Emanuele Grassi, 2016. "The returns to temporary migration: The case of Italian Ph.D.s," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2016/15, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    10. repec:nbr:nberch:14100 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ran Abramitzky & Leah Boustan, 2017. "Immigration in American Economic History," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 55(4), pages 1311-1345, December.
    12. Edward P. Lazear, 2017. "Why Are Some Immigrant Groups More Successful than Others?," NBER Working Papers 23548, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Hyun Lee, 2016. "Quantitative Impact of Reducing Barriers to Skilled Labor Immigration: The Case of the US H-1B Visa," Working papers 2016-35, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    14. HASHIMOTO Yuki, 2017. "Highly Skilled Immigrants' Occupational Choices and the Japanese Employment System," Discussion papers 17059, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).

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