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The Argentina Paradox: Microexplanations and Macropuzzles

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  • Alan M. Taylor

Abstract

The economic history of Argentina presents one of the most dramatic examples of divergence in the modern era. What happened and why? This paper reviews the wide range of competing explanations in the literature and argues that, setting aside deeper social and political determinants, the various economic mechanisms in play defy the idea of a monocausal explanation.

Suggested Citation

  • Alan M. Taylor, 2014. "The Argentina Paradox: Microexplanations and Macropuzzles," NBER Working Papers 19924, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19924 Note: DAE DEV EFG IFM
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    Cited by:

    1. Dabús, Carlos & Tohmé, Fernando & Caraballo, M. Ángeles, 2016. "A middle income trap in a small open economy: Modeling the Argentinean case," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 436-444.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • N16 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • P52 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems - - - Comparative Studies of Particular Economies

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