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Spillovers of Prosocial Motivation: Evidence from an Intervention Study on Blood Donors

Author

Listed:
  • Adrian Bruhin
  • Lorenz Goette
  • Simon Haenni
  • Lingqing Jiang

Abstract

Spillovers of prosocial motivation are crucial for the formation of social capital. They facilitate interactions among individuals and create social multipliers that amplify the effects of policy interventions. We conducted a large-scale intervention study among dyads of blood donors to investigate whether social ties lead to motivational spillovers in the decision to donate. The intervention is a randomized phone call making donors aware of a current shortage of their blood type and serving us as an instrument for identifying motivational spillovers. About 40% of a donor's motivation spills over to the other donor, creating a significant social multiplier of 1.78.

Suggested Citation

  • Adrian Bruhin & Lorenz Goette & Simon Haenni & Lingqing Jiang, 2014. "Spillovers of Prosocial Motivation: Evidence from an Intervention Study on Blood Donors," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 14.10, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
  • Handle: RePEc:lau:crdeep:14.10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michalis Drouvelis & Benjamin Marx, 2018. "Prosociality Spillovers of Working with Others," CESifo Working Paper Series 6849, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Francesco Drago & Friederike Mengel & Christian Traxler, 2015. "Compliance Behavior in Networks: Evidence from a Field Experiment," CSEF Working Papers 419, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    3. Lingqing Jiang, 2016. "Splash with A teammate: Peer Effects in High-Stakes Tournaments," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 16.18, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social Interaction; Social Ties; Prosocial Motivation; Blood Donation; Bivariate Probit;

    JEL classification:

    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation

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