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The Costs of Early School Leaving in Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Brunello, Giorgio

    (University of Padova)

  • De Paola, Maria

    (University of Calabria)

Abstract

The reduction of early school leaving to less than 10 percent of the relevant population by 2020 is a headline target in the Europe 2020 strategy and one of the five benchmarks of the strategic framework for European cooperation in education and training. Designing adequate policies to combat early school leaving is a difficult task that requires both the identification of causal links and the measurement of costs and benefits. In this paper, we review the issues surrounding the measurement of the costs of early school leaving to individuals and societies, and examine several implemented policies that are expected to affect early school leavers. These include broad policies – such as changes in minimum school leaving age, tracking and school resources – as well as more targeted policies. While our focus is mainly on Europe, we also consider important evidence from across the Atlantic.

Suggested Citation

  • Brunello, Giorgio & De Paola, Maria, 2013. "The Costs of Early School Leaving in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 7791, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7791
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. International Labour Office., 2015. "Global employment trends for youth 2015 : scaling up investments in decent jobs for youth," Global Employment Trends Reports 994891803402676, International Labour Office, Economic and Labour Market Analysis Department.
    2. Mhairi C. Beaton & Stephanie Thomson & Sarah Cornelius & Rachel Lofthouse & Quinta Kools & Susanne Huber, 2021. "Conceptualising Teacher Education for Inclusion: Lessons for the Professional Learning of Educators from Transnational and Cross-Sector Perspectives," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 13(4), pages 1-17, February.
    3. Ignacio García-Pérez, J. & Hidalgo-Hidalgo, Marisa, 2017. "No student left behind? Evidence from the Programme for School Guidance in Spain," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 97-111.
    4. Cristina Belles-Obrero & Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Judit Vall-Castello, 2015. "The Unintended Effects of Increasing the Legal Working Age on Family Behaviour”," Working Papers 2015-09, FEDEA.
    5. Smyth, Emer & Banks, Joanne & Whelan, Adele & Darmody, Merike & McCoy, Selina, 2015. "Review of the School Completion Programme," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS44.
    6. De Paola, Maria & Brunello, Giorgio, 2016. "Education as a Tool for the Economic Integration of Migrants," IZA Discussion Papers 9836, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    7. Ralph Hippe & Maciej Jakubowski, 2018. "Immigrant background and expected early school leaving in Europe: evidence from PISA," JRC Working Papers JRC109065, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    8. Erten, Bilge & Keskin, Pinar, 2019. "Compulsory schooling for whom? The role of gender, poverty, and religiosity," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 187-203.
    9. Natalie Obergruber, 2018. "Mikroökonometrische Analyse der individuellen und institutionellen Determinanten von Bildung und Berufswahl," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 80.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Europe; early school leaving; policy evaluation;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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