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Students are Almost as Effective as Professors in University Teaching

Author

Listed:
  • Feld, Jan

    () (Victoria University of Wellington)

  • Salamanca, Nicolas

    () (Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research)

  • Zölitz, Ulf

    () (University of Zurich)

Abstract

In a previous paper, we have shown that academic rank is largely unrelated to tutorial teaching effectiveness. In this paper, we further explore the effectiveness of the lowest-ranked instructors: students. We confirm that students are almost as effective as senior instructors, and we produce results informative on the effects of expanding the use of student instructors. We conclude that hiring moderately more student instructors would not harm students, but exclusively using them will likely negatively affect student outcomes. Given how inexpensive student instructors are, however, such a policy might still be worth it.

Suggested Citation

  • Feld, Jan & Salamanca, Nicolas & Zölitz, Ulf, 2019. "Students are Almost as Effective as Professors in University Teaching," IZA Discussion Papers 12491, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12491
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Feld, Jan & Salamanca, Nicolás & Zölitz, Ulf, 2018. "Are professors worth it? The value-added and costs of tutorial instructors," Working Paper Series 7955, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    2. David N. Figlio & Morton O. Schapiro & Kevin B. Soter, 2015. "Are Tenure Track Professors Better Teachers?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(4), pages 715-724, October.
    3. Belton Fleisher & Masanori Hashimoto & Bruce A. Weinberg, 2002. "Foreign GTAs Can Be Effective Teachers of Economics," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 299-325, December.
    4. Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2007. "Inverse probability weighted estimation for general missing data problems," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 141(2), pages 1281-1301, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    student instructors; university; teacher performance;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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