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Dynamics of child poverty in the European countries

Author

Listed:
  • Elena Bárcena-Martín

    () (University of Malaga, Spain)

  • M. Carmen Blanco-Arana

    () (University of Malaga, Spain)

  • Salvador Pérez-Moreno

    () (University of Malaga, Spain)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to analyse to what extent the previous status of children in poverty affects current child poverty, even when we control for observed and unobserved individual heterogeneity and treat the initial condition problem. On the basis of Wooldridge’s (2005) methodology, we estimate a dynamic random effects probit model considering three levels due to the hierarchical structure of our data: observations for each year (level 1) of the children (level 2) nested into countries (level 3). We corroborate the relevance of lagged status in poverty and assess the role of context variables in explaining differences across countries in child poverty dynamics. In particular, we highlight the significance of family benefits in reducing child poverty and assess which features of these benefits are more effective to reduce child poverty: means tested vs. non-means tested benefits. This way, some key insights are provided to design more effective public policies to alleviate child poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Bárcena-Martín & M. Carmen Blanco-Arana & Salvador Pérez-Moreno, 2017. "Dynamics of child poverty in the European countries," Working Papers 437, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
  • Handle: RePEc:inq:inqwps:ecineq2017-437
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    File URL: http://www.ecineq.org/milano/WP/ECINEQ2017-437.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    child poverty persistence; state dependence; initial conditions; social transfers; family benefits;

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