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Political Institutions and Growth Collapses

Author

Listed:
  • Ugo Panizza
  • Alejandro Gaviria
  • Ernesto H. Stein
  • Jessica Seddon Wallack

Abstract

This paper tests whether Rodrik`s (1999) results that institutions for conflict management are associated with the ability to react to economic shocks are robust to different ways of defining the quality of such institutions. We measure the quality of conflict management institutions with two different indices. The first is an index of political constraints on the ability of the executive to impose its will. These constraints limit the ability of the government to arbitrarily change the rules of the game and therefore may reduce redistributive struggles. The second index measures the degree of political particularism. We define political particularism as the policymakers` ability to further their career by catering to narrow interests rather than broader national platforms. The indices used in this paper solve the endogeneity and subjectivity biases that affect Rodrik`s measure of institutional quality. We find strong support for the idea that high levels of political constraints and intermediate levels of political particularism are associated with a quick recovery from economic shocks.

Suggested Citation

  • Ugo Panizza & Alejandro Gaviria & Ernesto H. Stein & Jessica Seddon Wallack, 2000. "Political Institutions and Growth Collapses," Research Department Publications 4207, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4207
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:idb:brikps:35478 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Persson, Torsten & Tabellini, Guido, 1999. "The size and scope of government:: Comparative politics with rational politicians," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 699-735, April.
    3. W. J. Henisz, 2000. "The Institutional Environment for Economic Growth," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(1), pages 1-31, March.
    4. Myerson, Roger B., 1999. "Theoretical comparisons of electoral systems," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(4-6), pages 671-697, April.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ugo Panizza & Mónica Yañez, 2005. "Why are Latin Americans so unhappy about reforms?," Journal of Applied Economics, Universidad del CEMA, vol. 8, pages 1-29, May.
    2. Mtiraoui, Abderraouf, 2015. "Gouvernance, Capital humain et Croissance économique dans la zone OCDE: Application sur les données de panel dynamique (GMM)
      [Governance, Human Capital and Economic Growth in OECD countries: Applyi
      ," MPRA Paper 61119, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Malik, Adeel & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2009. "The geography of output volatility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 163-178, November.
    4. Pitlik, Hans & Wirth, Steffen, 2003. "Do crises promote the extent of economic liberalization?: an empirical test," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 565-581, September.
    5. Malik, Adeel & Temple, Jonathan R.W., 2009. "The geography of output volatility," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 90(2), pages 163-178, November.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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