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Designing Impact Evaluations for Agricultural Projects

Author

Listed:
  • Paul Winters

    ()

  • Lina Salazar

    ()

  • Alessandro Maffioli

    ()

Abstract

The purpose of this guideline is to provide suggestions on designing impact evaluations for agricultural projects, particularly projects that directly target farmers, and seek to improve agricultural production, productivity and profitability. Specific issues in evaluating agricultural projects are addressed, including the need to use production-based indicators and to carefully consider indirect or spillover effects that are common in agricultural projects. The guideline considers the challenges of conducting impact evaluations of agricultural projects as well as the methods for assessing impact. Issues of collecting agricultural data for an impact evaluation and how to put together the overall design strategy in an evaluation plan are also covered. The guideline concludes with three case studies of impact evaluations designed for a technology adoption project in the Dominican Republic, a forestry/technology project in Nicaragua, and a crop insurance project in Peru.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Winters & Lina Salazar & Alessandro Maffioli, 2010. "Designing Impact Evaluations for Agricultural Projects," SPD Working Papers 1007, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD).
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:spdwps:1007
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dercon, Stefan & Christiaensen, Luc, 2011. "Consumption risk, technology adoption and poverty traps: Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(2), pages 159-173, November.
    2. Hongbin Cai & Yuyu Chen & Hanming Fang & Li-An Zhou, 2009. "Microinsurance, Trust and Economic Development: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Field Experiment," NBER Working Papers 15396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Feder, Gershon & Just, Richard E & Zilberman, David, 1985. "Adoption of Agricultural Innovations in Developing Countries: A Survey," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(2), pages 255-298, January.
    4. Amir K. Abadi Ghadim & David J. Pannell & Michael P. Burton, 2005. "Risk, uncertainty, and learning in adoption of a crop innovation," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 33(1), pages 1-9, July.
    5. Ximena V. Del Carpio & Norman Loayza & Gayatri Datar, 2011. "Is Irrigation Rehabilitation Good for Poor Farmers? An Impact Evaluation of a Non‐Experimental Irrigation Project in Peru," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(2), pages 449-473, June.
    6. Barnett, Barry J. & Barrett, Christopher B. & Skees, Jerry R., 2008. "Poverty Traps and Index-Based Risk Transfer Products," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1766-1785, October.
    7. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule to Estimate the Effect of Class Size on Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jeremy Jelliffe & Boris E. Bravo-Ureta & C. Michael Deom & David Kalule Okello, 2016. "The Sustainability Of Farmer-Led Multiplication And Dissemination Of High-Yield And Disease Resistant Groundnut Varieties," Zwick Center Research Reports 04, University of Connecticut, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Charles J. Zwick Center for Food and Resource Policy.
    2. Jelliffe, Jeremy L. & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Deom, C. Michael, 2015. "Adaptation and Adoption of Improved Seeds through Extension: Evidence from Farmer-Led Groundnut Multiplication in Uganda," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205980, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
    3. Murathi Kiratu, Nixon, 2014. "An Assessment of the Impact of Kilimo Plus Subsidy Program on Smallholder Farmers' Food Security and Income in Nakuru North District, Kenya," Research Theses 243470, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    4. Onil Banerjee & Kevin Boyle & Cassandra Rogers & Janice Cumberbatch & Barbara Kanninen & Michele H. Lemay & Maja Schling, 2016. "A Retrospective Stated Preference Approach to Assessment of Coastal Infrastructure Investments: An Application to Barbados," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 95856, Inter-American Development Bank.
    5. Giuliani, Elisa & Pietrobelli, Carlo, 2014. "Social Network Analysis Methodologies for the Evaluation of Cluster Development Programs," Papers in Innovation Studies 2014/11, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation, Research and Competences in the Learning Economy.
    6. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
    7. Onil Banerjee & Kevin Boyle & Cassandra Rogers & Janice Cumberbatch & Barbara Kanninen & Michele H. Lemay & Maja Schling, 2016. "A Retrospective Stated Preference Approach to Assessment of Coastal Infrastructure Investments: An Application to Barbados," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 7849, Inter-American Development Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Impact Evaluation; Agriculture; Technology Adoption; Development Effectiveness; Dominican Republic; PACTA; Nicaragua; APAGRO Program; Cotton Farmers; Peru;

    JEL classification:

    • H43 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Project Evaluation; Social Discount Rate
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O22 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Project Analysis
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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