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Adaptation and Adoption of Improved Seeds through Extension: Evidence from Farmer-Led Groundnut Multiplication in Uganda

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Listed:
  • Jelliffe, Jeremy L.
  • Bravo-Ureta, Boris E.
  • Deom, C. Michael

Abstract

In sub-Saharan Africa, reliance on subsistence-level farming is a significant source of risk since farmers face protracted periods of drought and the frequent incidence and expanding reach of diseases and pests. It is likely that such occurrences will be exacerbated by global climate change, given recent forecasts and scientific findings. One strategy to mitigate these effects is through the adoption of new technologies. Following the established literature on technology adoption and productivity, this work is a reassessment of a 2004 AT Uganda farmer-led seed multiplication and dissemination project for groundnut growers. The major objective of this research is to determine the lasting impact of the project with respect to the adoption of rosette resistant varieties of groundnuts (RRVs). Panel data for the 2004 and 2013 growing seasons are used and include a set of participating farm households (HHs) and non-participating (control) HHs. The control sample is composed of both a neighboring and a non-neighboring farm group, which makes it possible to account for spillover effects and selection bias. In order to further control for possible biases, our identification strategy employs propensity score matching and instrumental variables methods. In this way, we examine the sustainability and lasting impact of the original intervention a decade after the fact.

Suggested Citation

  • Jelliffe, Jeremy L. & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Deom, C. Michael, 2015. "Adaptation and Adoption of Improved Seeds through Extension: Evidence from Farmer-Led Groundnut Multiplication in Uganda," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205980, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea15:205980
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tanellari, Eftila & Kostandini, Genti & Bonabana-Wabbi, Jackline & Murray, Anthony, 2014. "Gender impacts on adoption of new technologies: the case of improved groundnut varieties in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 9(4), December.
    2. Boris Bravo-Ureta & William Greene & Daniel Solís, 2012. "Technical efficiency analysis correcting for biases from observed and unobserved variables: an application to a natural resource management project," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 55-72, August.
    3. Foster, Andrew D & Rosenzweig, Mark R, 1995. "Learning by Doing and Learning from Others: Human Capital and Technical Change in Agriculture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(6), pages 1176-1209, December.
    4. Timothy Conley & Udry Christopher, 2001. "Social Learning Through Networks: The Adoption of New Agricultural Technologies in Ghana," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 668-673.
    5. Akhter Ali & Awudu Abdulai, 2010. "The Adoption of Genetically Modified Cotton and Poverty Reduction in Pakistan," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 175-192.
    6. Timothy G. Conley & Christopher R. Udry, 2010. "Learning about a New Technology: Pineapple in Ghana," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 35-69, March.
    7. Smith, Lisa C. & Elobeid, Amani & Jensen, Helen H. & Johnson, Stanley R., 1999. "Geography and Causes of Food Insecurity in Developing Countries (The)," Staff General Research Papers Archive 1651, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Paul Winters & Lina Salazar & Alessandro Maffioli, 2010. "Designing Impact Evaluations for Agricultural Projects," SPD Working Papers 1007, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Strategic Planning and Development Effectiveness (SPD).
    9. Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele & Muricho, Geoffrey, 2011. "Agricultural Technology, Crop Income, and Poverty Alleviation in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1784-1795.
    10. Becerril, Javier & Abdulai, Awudu, 2010. "The Impact of Improved Maize Varieties on Poverty in Mexico: A Propensity Score-Matching Approach," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(7), pages 1024-1035, July.
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    12. Smith, Lisa C. & Obeid, Amani E. El & Jensen, Helen H., 2000. "The geography and causes of food insecurity in developing countries," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 22(2), March.
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    Keywords

    Farm Management; Production Economics; Risk and Uncertainty;

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