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Is sustainable transport policy sustainable?

  • Eliasson, Jonas

    ()

    (KTH)

  • Proost, Stef

    ()

    (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

The paper challenges the existing sustainable transport literature. Most sustainable transport plans focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in either one region or country and this neglects two handicaps of strong unilateral action. The first is that climate is a global commons problem so a strong binding international climate agreement is unlikely. The second is that a unilateral reduction of oil consumption by a limited number of countries will be partially, or even completely, offset by market responses – in some circumstances, cumulative emissions may even come earlier (the “green paradox”). When a coalition of the willing reduces oil use in the transport sector, this will delay rather than reduce total emissions. This requires rethinking climate policies for the transport sector: what policies remain cost effective in reducing greenhouse gas emissions?

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File URL: http://www.transportportal.se/swopec/CTS2014-2.pdf
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Paper provided by CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI) in its series Working papers in Transport Economics with number 2014:2.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 20 Jan 2014
Date of revision: 29 Sep 2014
Publication status: Published as Eliasson, Jonas and Stef Proost, 'Is sustainable transport policy sustainable?' in Transport Policy, 2015, pages 92-100.
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ctswps:2014_002
Contact details of provider: Postal: Centrum för Transportstudier (CTS), Teknikringen 10, 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden
Web page: http://www.cts.kth.se/

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  1. Tol, Richard S. J., 2011. "A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the EU 20/20/2020 Package," Papers WP367, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  2. Banister, David, 2008. "The sustainable mobility paradigm," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 15(2), pages 73-80, March.
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  5. EYCKMANS, Johan & TULKENS, Henry, 1999. "Simulating coalitionally stable burden sharing agreements for the climate change problem," CORE Discussion Papers 1999026, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
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  7. Barla, Philippe & Proost, Stef, 2012. "Energy efficiency policy in a non-cooperative world," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 2209-2215.
  8. Proost, Stef & Van Dender, Kurt, 2012. "Energy and environment challenges in the transport sector," Economics of Transportation, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 77-87.
  9. Yves Crozet, PR. & Lopez-Ruiz, Hector G., 2013. "Macromotives and microbehaviors: Climate change constraints and passenger mobility scenarios for France," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 294-302.
  10. Hickman, Robin & Ashiru, Olu & Banister, David, 2010. "Transport and climate change: Simulating the options for carbon reduction in London," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 110-125, March.
  11. Barrett, Scott, 1994. "Self-Enforcing International Environmental Agreements," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 46(0), pages 878-94, Supplemen.
  12. Meghan R. Busse & Christopher R. Knittel & Florian Zettelmeyer, 2013. "Are Consumers Myopic? Evidence from New and Used Car Purchases," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(1), pages 220-56, February.
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  14. Nakamura, Kazuki & Hayashi, Yoshitsugu, 2013. "Strategies and instruments for low-carbon urban transport: An international review on trends and effects," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 264-274.
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