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Agriculture, gendered time use, and nutritional outcomes: A systematic review:

Author

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  • Johnston, Deborah
  • Stevano, Sara
  • Malapit, Hazel J.
  • Hull, Elizabeth
  • Kadiyala, Suneetha

Abstract

Existing reviews on agriculture and nutrition consider limited evidence and focus on impact size, rather than impact pathway. This review overcomes the limitations of previous studies by considering a larger evidence base and exploring time as one of the agriculture-nutrition pathways. Agricultural development plays a role in improving nutrition. However, agricultural practices and interventions determine the amount of time dedicated to agricultural and domestic work. Time spent in agriculture—especially by women—competes with time needed for resting, childcare, and food preparation and can have unintended negative consequences for nutrition.

Suggested Citation

  • Johnston, Deborah & Stevano, Sara & Malapit, Hazel J. & Hull, Elizabeth & Kadiyala, Suneetha, 2015. "Agriculture, gendered time use, and nutritional outcomes: A systematic review:," IFPRI discussion papers 1456, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1456
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ruel, Marie T. & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Balagamwala, Mysbah, 2017. "Nutrition-sensitive agriculture: What have we learned and where do we go from here?:," IFPRI discussion papers 1681, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. repec:eee:deveng:v:2:y:2017:i:c:p:114-131 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Fiorella Picchioni & Lukasz Aleksandrowicz & Mieghan M. Bruce & Soledad Cuevas & Paula Dominguez-Salas & Lili Jia & Mehroosh Tak, 2016. "Agri-health research: what have we learned and where do we go next?," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 291-298, February.
    4. Johnson, Nancy L. & Balagamwala, Mysbah & Pinkstaff, Crossley & Theis, Sophie & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2017. "How do agricultural development projects aim to empower women?: Insights from an analysis of project strategies," IFPRI discussion papers 1609, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Keywords

    agriculture; gender; women; nutrition; households;

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