IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/ssefpa/v10y2018i6d10.1007_s12571-018-0857-5.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of agricultural input subsidies on food and nutrition security: a systematic review

Author

Listed:
  • Helen L. Walls

    () (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
    Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture & Health)

  • Deborah Johnston

    (Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture & Health
    University of London)

  • Mehroosh Tak

    (Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture & Health
    University of London)

  • Jane Dixon

    (Australian National University)

  • Johanna Hanefeld

    (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine)

  • Elizabeth Hull

    (Leverhulme Centre for Integrative Research on Agriculture & Health
    University of London)

  • Richard D. Smith

    (University of Exeter)

Abstract

Agricultural input subsidies, a form of social protection, are often considered an important means of improving agricultural productivity in low- and middle-income countries. However, their effectiveness and efficiency remains contentious with respect to productivity, economic and consumer welfare measures, as well as food and nutrition security. This is exacerbated by a weak evidence base, including no review focused on the impact of agricultural input subsidies on food security and nutrition. Further, where studies have considered nutritional outcomes of agricultural input subsidy interventions, this has often been in regard to changes in consumption of the targeted staple food, measured in terms of calorie consumption or a similar measure of changes in energy availability, ignoring other aspects of malnutrition, including impacts from dietary diversity. This wider consideration of impacts from dietary diversity is important, given the increasing recognition in nutrition policy of its importance. We address this gap in the literature with a review of the evidence on the impact of agricultural input subsidy programmes on nutrition and nutrition-related health in low- and middle-income countries, mapping this evidence against a conceptual framework of the mediating pathways.

Suggested Citation

  • Helen L. Walls & Deborah Johnston & Mehroosh Tak & Jane Dixon & Johanna Hanefeld & Elizabeth Hull & Richard D. Smith, 2018. "The impact of agricultural input subsidies on food and nutrition security: a systematic review," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(6), pages 1425-1436, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0857-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s12571-018-0857-5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12571-018-0857-5
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Harrigan, Jane, 2008. "Food insecurity, poverty and the Malawian Starter Pack: Fresh start or false start?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 237-249, June.
    2. Harttgen, Kenneth & Klasen, Stephan & Rischke, Ramona, 2016. "Analyzing nutritional impacts of price and income related shocks in Malawi: Simulating household entitlements to food," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 31-43.
    3. Birte Snilstveit & Sandy Oliver & Martina Vojtkova, 2012. "Narrative approaches to systematic review and synthesis of evidence for international development policy and practice," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 409-429, September.
    4. Channing Arndt & Karl Pauw & James Thurlow, 2016. "The Economy-wide Impacts and Risks of Malawi's Farm Input Subsidy Program," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 98(3), pages 962-980.
    5. Von Braun, Joachim, 1988. "Effects of technological change in agriculture on food consumption and nutrition: Rice in a West African setting," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(9), pages 1083-1098, September.
    6. Chibwana, Christopher & Fisher, Monica & Shively, Gerald, 2012. "Cropland Allocation Effects of Agricultural Input Subsidies in Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 124-133.
    7. Peters, Pauline, 1996. "Failed Magic Or Social Context? Market Liberalization And The Rural Poor In Malawi," Harvard Institute for International Development (HIID) Papers 294379, Harvard University, Kennedy School of Government.
    8. Ecker, Olivier & Qaim, Matin, 2010. "Analyzing nutritional impacts of policies: An empirical study for Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 1017, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Henry Kankwamba & Mariam Kadzamira & Karl Pauw, 2018. "How diversified is cropping in Malawi? Patterns, determinants and policy implications," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(2), pages 323-338, April.
    10. Johnston, Deborah & Stevano, Sara & Malapit, Hazel J. & Hull, Elizabeth & Kadiyala, Suneetha, 2018. "Review: Time Use as an Explanation for the Agri-Nutrition Disconnect: Evidence from Rural Areas in Low and Middle-Income Countries," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 8-18.
    11. Ecker, Olivier & Qaim, Matin, 2011. "Analyzing Nutritional Impacts of Policies: An Empirical Study for Malawi," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 412-428, March.
    12. Xavier Cirera & Dirk Willenbockel & Rajith W.D. Lakshman, 2014. "Evidence On The Impact Of Tariff Reductions On Employment In Developing Countries: A Systematic Review," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(3), pages 449-471, July.
    13. T.S. Jayne & Shahidur Rashid, 2013. "Input subsidy programs in sub-Saharan Africa: a synthesis of recent evidence," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 44(6), pages 547-562, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nicole M. Mason & Ayala Wineman & Solomon T. Tembo, 2020. "Reducing poverty by ‘ignoring the experts’? Evidence on input subsidies in Zambia," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(5), pages 1157-1172, October.
    2. Ivana Kravčáková Vozárová & Rastislav Kotulič & Roman Vavrek, 2020. "Assessing Impacts of CAP Subsidies on Financial Performance of Enterprises in Slovak Republic," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 12(3), pages 1-18, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:ssefpa:v:10:y:2018:i:6:d:10.1007_s12571-018-0857-5. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.