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Effects of technological change in agriculture on food consumption and nutrition: Rice in a West African setting

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  • Von Braun, Joachim

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  • Von Braun, Joachim, 1988. "Effects of technological change in agriculture on food consumption and nutrition: Rice in a West African setting," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 16(9), pages 1083-1098, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:16:y:1988:i:9:p:1083-1098
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    Cited by:

    1. Hanjra, Munir A. & Ferede, Tadele & Gutta, Debel Gemechu, 2009. "Reducing poverty in sub-Saharan Africa through investments in water and other priorities," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 96(7), pages 1062-1070, July.
    2. Doss, Cheryl, 2013. "Intrahousehold bargaining and resource allocation in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6337, The World Bank.
    3. Gerbens-Leenes, P. W. & Nonhebel, S., 2002. "Consumption patterns and their effects on land required for food," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(1-2), pages 185-199, August.
    4. Lixing Li & Xiaoyu Wu, 2011. "Gender of Children, Bargaining Power, and Intrahousehold Resource Allocation in China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 295-316.
    5. Joachim Von Braun & Maarten DC Immink, 1990. "Cultivo de Hortalizas no Tradicionales para Exportación entre Pequeños Agricultores en Guatemala: Impacto sobre su Ingreso Familiar y Seguridad Alimentaria," Latin American Journal of Economics-formerly Cuadernos de Economía, Instituto de Economía. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile., vol. 27(81), pages 291-308.
    6. Philip H. Brown, 2009. "Dowry and Intrahousehold Bargaining: Evidence from China," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(1).
    7. Ranis, Gustav & Stewart, Frances & Ramirez, Alejandro, 2000. "Economic Growth and Human Development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 197-219, February.
    8. Lilja, Nina & Sanders, John H., 1998. "Welfare impacts of technological change on women in southern Mali," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 73-79, September.
    9. Alejandro Ramirez & Gustav Ranis, 1997. "Economic Growth and Human Development," Working Papers 787, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    10. Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei, 2012. "Siblings, public facilities and education returns in China," MPRA Paper 38922, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Nyang'au, Paul Nyamweya, 2018. "Impact Of Integrated Pest Management Technology On Food Security Among Mango Farmers In Machakos County, Kenya," Research Theses 276453, Collaborative Masters Program in Agricultural and Applied Economics.
    12. Fan, Linlin & Nogueira, Lia & Baylis, Katherine R., 2013. "Agricultural Market Reforms and Nutritional Transition in Rural China," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150203, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    13. Muriithi, B. & Gichungi, H., 2018. "Effect of Technology Innovation on Gender Roles: A case of Fruit Fly IPM Strategy on Women s Decision Making in Mango Production and Marketing in Kenya," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 277398, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    14. Lilja, Nina K. & Sanders, John H., 1998. "Welfare impacts of technological change on women in southern Mali," Agricultural Economics of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 19(1-2), September.
    15. Beddow, Jason M. & Hurley, Terrance M. & Pardey, Philip G. & Alston, Julian M., 2015. "Rethinking yield gaps," Staff Papers 201093, University of Minnesota, Department of Applied Economics.
    16. Nyang’au, Paul Nyamweya & Nzuma, Jonathan & Irungu, Patrick & Muriithi, Beatrice, 2018. "A Thesis Submitted In Partial Fulfillment Of The Requirements For The Award Of A Master Of Science Degree In Agricultural And Applied Economics, University Of Nairobi," Dissertations and Theses 276387, University of Nairobi, Department of Agricultural Economics.

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