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Diversification, Climate Risk and Vulnerability to Poverty: Evidence from Rural Malawi

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  • Asfaw, Solomon
  • McCarthy, Nancy
  • Paolantonio, Adriana
  • Cavatassi, Romina
  • Amare, Mulubrhan
  • Lipper, Leslie

Abstract

This paper investigates factors that impact cropland, labour and income diversification decisions and subsequent impacts on welfare. We use geo-referenced household data collected in 2011 from Malawi. The results show that measures of climate risk generally increase diversification across labour, cropland and income indicating that rainfall riskiness is a “push” factor for these indices. Our results also reveal that “pull” factors such as household wealth and education status of the household generally increase diversification across labour, land and income. Results also show that vulnerability to poverty is lower in environments with greater climate variability. Availability of services and support from rural institutions tends to increase diversification and reduce vulnerability to poverty. Looking at welfare measures as a function of diversification indices, all three measures of diversification increase consumption per capita, but income diversification has the strongest impacts on current consumption per capita and in reducing vulnerability to poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Asfaw, Solomon & McCarthy, Nancy & Paolantonio, Adriana & Cavatassi, Romina & Amare, Mulubrhan & Lipper, Leslie, 2015. "Diversification, Climate Risk and Vulnerability to Poverty: Evidence from Rural Malawi," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 230216, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae15:230216
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Asfaw, Solomon & Palma, Alessandro & Lipper, Leslie, 2016. "Diversification Strategies and Adaptation Deficit: Evidence from Niger," 2016 Fifth International Conference, September 23-26, 2016, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia 246282, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE).

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    Keywords

    Environmental Economics and Policy; International Development;

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