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Climate change adaptation in Ethiopia: to what extent does social protection influence livelihood diversification?

Author

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  • Prowse, Martin
  • Weldegebriel, Zerihune Berhane

Abstract

Ethiopia is vulnerable to climate change due to its limited development and dependence on agriculture. Social protection schemes like the Productive Safety Net Programme (PSNP) can play a positive role in promoting livelihoods and enhancing households’ risk management. This article examines the impact of the PSNP by using Propensity Score Matching to estimate the effect on income diversification. The results show receiving transfers from the PSNP, on average, increases natural resource extraction (one component of off-farm income). While these results should be treated with caution, they suggest the PSNP may not be helping smallholders diversify income sources in a positive manner for climate adaptation. The article concludes by arguing for further investigation of the PSNP’s influence on smallholders’ adaptation strategies.

Suggested Citation

  • Prowse, Martin & Weldegebriel, Zerihune Berhane, 2012. "Climate change adaptation in Ethiopia: to what extent does social protection influence livelihood diversification?," IOB Working Papers 2012.11, Universiteit Antwerpen, Institute of Development Policy (IOB).
  • Handle: RePEc:iob:wpaper:2012011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Davies & Christophe Béné & Alexander Arnall & Thomas Tanner & Andrew Newsham & Cristina Coirolo, 2013. "Promoting Resilient Livelihoods through Adaptive Social Protection: Lessons from 124 programmes in South Asia," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31(1), pages 27-58, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tagel Gebrehiwot & Carolina Castilla, 2018. "Do safety net transfers improve household diets and reduce undernutrition? Evidence from rural Ethiopia," Working Papers PMMA 2018-03, PEP-PMMA.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:107:y:2018:i:c:p:87-97 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Ethiopia; climate change;

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